Feature, 03.10.2016

Rêveries Urbaines
Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec share their ideal urban settings
Oct 08, 2016 – Jan 22, 2017

Studio Bouroullec

Studio Bouroullec

Internationally renowned industrial designers Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec elucidate their thoughts on urban development and public spaces by presenting a diverse body of work and the results of their ongoing research at the Vitra Fire Station. What can be seen as a wide-ranging study of possible development solutions for cities, the exhibition Rêveries Urbaines seeks to list new forms and concepts that may be imagined in various urban settings. Like glimpsing inside the brothers’ notebooks, the proposed solutions are revealed to visitors as they wander through models and animations, immersing themselves in different scenarios and urban fictions. Unlike the duo’s usual domestic approach to design and focus on the individual, the exhibited proposals solely concentrate on public spaces and the relationship between inhabitant and city. The metamorphosis of spaces through lines, harmony and transparency aims to give a new sense of magic to the places in our cities where we walk, meet and talk. The designers’ “dreamscapes” take into consideration pre-established urban functions and remind us of a new direction in the connection between buildings, the quality of a pavement, where a fountain is situated, the planting of a jungle; all the elements that city dwellers should care about in order to add more charm to the city.

“The exhibition presents our open and abundant research, a ‘pragmatic reverie’ that is designed to exist in public spaces.” – Ronan

“In our work, no project is dedicated to a particular person or place. The exhibition brings together propositions for developing public spaces that have an element of abstraction. They reply to a question that is not completely clear. It is in this vacuum that? our propositions could be potentially re-imagined on site.” – Erwan


Feature, 19.09.2016

The retrospective Alexander Girard:
A Designer’s Universe unveils the iconic designer’s oeuvre
Mar 12, 2016 – Jan 22, 2017

Miller House, Columbus, Indiana, USA, 1953-1957, photo: Balthazar Korab of The Library of Congress / arm chair No. 66310, 1967, series production by Herman Miller Furniture Co., collection Vitra Design Museum, photo: Copyright Vitra Design Museum, Jürgen Hans / Exhibition catalogue

Miller House, Columbus, IN, USA, 1953-1957, photo: Balthazar Korab of The Library of Congress / arm chair No. 66310, 1967, series production by Herman Miller Furniture Co., collection Vitra Design Museum, photo: Copyright Vitra Design Museum, Jürgen Hans / Exhibition catalogue

“My greatest enjoyment and satisfaction in the solution of any project is uncovering the latent fantasy and magic in it.” — Alexander Girard

Alexander Girard, one of the most seminal and prolific designers of the 20th century, has left a rich cultural legacy spanning a wide array of disciplines including graphic, interior, exhibition and furniture design. More than anything, it’s Girard’s renowned textile designs that have elevated him to the highest ranks of design and to a classic status. Known for his playful ideas which attest to a passion for colours, adornment and international folk art, Girard’s creations are characteristically replete with aplomb and theatricality. His forward-thinking designs and charisma derived from an unwavering insouciance and not taking things too seriously, a mentality which directly related to his constant hankering after travels, immersing in different cultures and curiously exploring the unknown. When talking about his obsession with folk art, Girard said, “I think that I saw it as a way to recapture all the wonderful enthusiasm and the spirit of discovery that we experience as children but generally lose as we grow older.” “For Girard, design was not to be ruled by asceticism, but by joy, a lust for life, and the celebration of the everyday,” writes Mateo Kries, director of the Vitra Design Museum which presents the first major retrospective on the visionary designer. Titled Alexander Girard: A Designer’s Universe the exhibition presents his oeuvre with a never-before-shown multitude of textiles, furnishings, objects and personal documents and drawings. The show aims to reveal Girard’s multi-faceted vision, sources of inspiration and the contemporaries who influenced his creative cosmos—from his extensive collection of folk art to his collaborations with Charles & Ray Eames.

Feature, 19.07.2016

Design Display – Positions in Contemporary Design
Exhibition #2: Muji Cutlery and Modern Shelf
June – October 2016

Photos Ingo Mittelstaed
Photos: Ingo Mittelstaedt

Two objects facing each other in a glass display case like two protagonists in a state of momentary inertia right before delivering their lines on stage. The objects’ potential functions, and aesthetic qualities encourage the viewer to further dissect their characteristics and initiate a dialogue. And that’s precisely Design Display’s objective: the exhibition series at the Autostadt in Wolfsburg seeks to demonstrate the role design plays in our daily lives and to proliferate discussions about its social and political dimensions. Every four months, Design Display presents a new exhibition featuring two design projects, and releases an accompanying magazine that mimics the duality of the setting while delving deeper into the chosen subject through essays and opinion pieces. Starting in July 2016, the new exhibition’s pervading theme is “simplicity”—an underlying design principle that for many is the key to happiness in objects, embodied through abstinence, reduction and focusing on the essentials. For this iteration, the glass case is inhabited by Jasper Morrison’s cutlery for Muji and Rafael Horzon’s Modern shelf. A constant conceptual thread in Morrison’s work, the act of simplifying is evident in his designs for the Japanese company. Cutlery should first and foremost feel good in the hand—the simple and simultaneously elegant form is not an end in itself but instead derives from its use. On the opposing end of the glass rectangle, we find a shelving unit that suggests a different kind of simplicity, one that’s based on the notion of quick, easy and inexpensive design. Horzon’s Modern shelf stands as an ode to material reduction with hints of humour and irony. Albeit ordinary and unremarkable, Horzon’s storage unit puts emphasis on the importance of the basic and the narrative behind its creation. For more information on the exhibition series visit Design Display’s website.

Feature, 28.06.2016

Faraway, So Close – 25th Biennial of Design in Slovenia


The Museum of Architecture and Design (MAO, Ljubljana) has launched an open call for participation in FARAWAY, SO CLOSE – 25th Biennial of Design, curated by editor and curator Angela Rui and MAO curator Maja Vardjan. The open call is dedicated to designers, architects, filmmakers, graphic designers, interaction designers, illustrators, writers, animators, photographers, researchers and other interdisciplinary agents who see the biennial as an experimental, collaborative platform for testing, developing and sharing their own approaches and expertise around the issues and structure of the new biennial format. From 25 May to 29 October 2017, FARAWAY, SO CLOSE will present seven local interventions under the main exhibition umbrella. For this, seven creative figures from Slovenia have been selected for their projects outside the field of design and paired with international designers to form a team. Selected participants will work within these teams and together they will use design and architecture as tools for investigating contemporary issues. 

Read more in an interview with the two curators on Domus.

Application deadline: 10 July 2016
Kick-off event: 15 September 2016, Ljubljana
More information and application: www.bio.si/en

Interview, 12.06.2016

The Concept of Utopia within the Design World
Swiss Design Awards 2016

On the occasion of the 2016 Swiss Design Awards, BUREAU N launched a series of interviews with all the participants of the design competition – organised annually by the Swiss Federal Office of Culture – in the run-up to the exhibition in Basel. The interviews aim to dissect the participants’ personal concept of utopia in relation to their practice, methods and strategies. Selected designers express their definition of utopia and their opinion on whether design is capable of changing societal systems. Is utopia the truth of tomorrow, as Victor Hugo has suggested, or merely an ideal conviction that ultimately pushes us towards a different reality and set of constructs? Utopia. The word celebrates its 500th anniversary this year: Thomas More’s influential and radical text on the term was first published in 1516. The British Renaissance humanist was the first to give a name to an idea that has triggered and empowered imagination ever since—the creation of a better world is possible. Utopia refers, in the original meaning of the Greek word, to both a place with positive connotations and a non-place. It invites us to a traveller’s log portraying an ideal society on a fictional island in the Atlantic Ocean. More’s work continues to inspire us and offers frameworks for innovation today, stressing the importance of the process of imagination as well as dreaming in the here and now.

cavadini_simone_res pvblica_5
“Having an element of utopia in one’s work is very important. The constant search for something that may not ever exist can potentially lead to new ideas, pushing projects and boundaries further and further.” — Simone Cavadini is a photographer who in his current project RES PVBLICA analyses the relationship between performance and power in the Italian media.

“Without the utopian idea which influences my actions in the here and now—and paves the way, so to speak—I would constantly repeat myself artistically.” — Fashion designer Sandro Marzo is a firm believer in the idea that design is everything, and everything is design. In his opinion, design is in fact capable of effecting social change.

“Utopia is looking for an undetectable answer that motivates you to keep working on different projects. In my work, the word utopia relates to a certain hyperreal aesthetic. Through this particular aesthetic, I refer to the hyper-commercialist codes that surround our visual society through advertising, but also internet aesthetics that subtly direct our desires and dreams. Utopia is omnipresent in my creative process. This imaginary element frees me, it allows me to create without limits or restrictions. Then I can see further, beyond the known.” — Maxime Guyon’s work oscillates between research on the constant evolution of technological functions in our current society and the role of a photographer in a post-internet era.

“Utopia represents a stage at which design annihilates itself, which consequently means that design is not capable of changing society. This may sound dystopian but this is exactly what pushes me to come up with both innovative and critical graphic patterns.” — Dan Solbach has established a practice almost exclusively focusing on graphic design for artists and contemporary art institutions.


“The role of the designer is not just to think about an object’s form and function. I see the designer as an antenna capturing moments, moods and needs. The designer helps create new ways of thinking. New approaches encourage a continual renewal essential to any development. Each creation is an interpretation of what surrounds us; a singular vision, a new view of the world. It is vital for our societies to knowingly reinvent themselves and recognize the impact of our collective choices on our future.” — Lucy Authié aims to strengthen the bonds between luxury and sustainability in product development.

 Read more interviews and find out more about the participants here.

Feature, 09.06.2016

A Casa di Iris Roth
Ceramic & Interior Designer in Milan

inside the studio of Iris Roth
Studio visit with Iris Roth in Milan

On the occasion of Salone del Mobile 2016, we paid a visit to ceramic and interior designer Iris Roth to gain insight into her working space and creative practice. In her charming apartment, located in the well-known architects’ building complex Cascia 6, the Italian-German artist hosts dinners, grows olive trees on her sunny terrace and works away in her compact studio. We also got a chance to peek inside her production space – a traditional ceramics atelier that has been supervised by an Italian couple since 1976. Iris Roth combines traditional craftsmanship with contemporary elements: simple forms, warm tones and traditional processes involving the potter’s wheel as an essential tool. The artist uses white clay coated in natural white or grey glazes, as well as the widely used red clay – prevalent in her nude collection. Small, intentional imperfections on the surfaces of handmade objects, such as the artisan’s fingerprints, give each item a unique character that distinguishes them from mass-produced ware. But aesthetics aside, it’s all about functionality: All objects are suitable for everyday use and are dishwasher-safe. For Louis Pretty in Berlin and the restaurant oTTo in Milan, Iris Roth has designed and produced their entire ceramic lines. Each of the pieces is unparallelled but the designs can be produced in large numbers. In addition to oTTo’s dinnerware, Iris also designed the interiors of the cosy, greenhouse-like bistro, which arguably offers the best sandwiches in town. Soon, Iris Roth’s pieces will be available online – till then make sure to follow her dolce vita on Instagram.

Feature, 22.04.2016

Interiors Palazzo Scalini and Light by Stilnovo
Galerie Jochum Rodgers
23.04. – 21.05.2016

Galerie Jochum Rodgers‘ exhibition Interiors Palazzo Scalini travels to the era of the Liberty style, where remarkable interior objects by Italian Art nouveau designer, ceramicist and visionaire Galileo Chini in collaboration with architect Carlo Spiccianl, will be on show. Chini’s fascination with cultures took him around the world, most notably to Siam, where he became inspired by Eastern aesthetics. He later incorporated these details into highly decorative furniture pieces, most notably for the joint commission with Spiccianl for the redesign of Palazzo Scalini. Upholstered leather chairs in striking red and gold are some of the works from this collaboration, which are on display for the first time in the exhibition. The parallel presentation of design innovation – Light by Stilnovo, Italy 1950-1960, documents lamps from the early production of the iconic lighting studio Stilnovo – with numerous models from the manufacturers’ 50’s and 60’s heyday.

Galerie Jochum Rodgers_Collage

Courtesy of Galerie Jochum Rodgers

Project, 21.04.2016

Swiss Grand Award for Design 2016
Laureates Announced
Jun 14 – 19, 2016

The Federal Office of Culture (FOC) has announced the laureates of the Swiss Grand Award for Design 2016 – textile designer Claudia Caviezel, furniture and interior designer Hans Eichenberger and graphic designer Ralph Schraivogel. They will receive their honours at the opening of the Swiss Design Awards 2016 In June in Basel. The exhibition runs in parallel with Art Basel and DesignMiami and will present interviews, in-depth profiles and photographic portraits of the award recipients. The awards launched in 2007 in order to highlight the work of well-known designers, which exemplify quality, relevance and dynamism of Swiss design practice both nationally and internationally.

Swiss Grand Award for Design 2016

Review, 10.03.2016

Swiss Grand Award for Art / Prix Meret Oppenheim
2016 laureates announced

With this year’s Swiss Grand Award for Art / Prix Meret Oppenheim, the Federal Office of Culture (FOC) has honoured three outstanding Swiss cultural practitioners: the curator Adelina von Fürstenberg, conceptual artist Christian Philipp Müller and architect and author Martin Steinmann. For the second time, The Prix Meret Oppenheim will run in parallel to Art Basel, together with the Swiss Art Awards 2016 exhibition. At this time, an exhibition with portraits of the winners will be on show, and a Prix Meret Oppenheim 2016 publication will also launch, which comprises interviews between Samuel Schallenberg and Adelina von Fürstenberg, Philip Ursprung and Christian Philipp Müller, and Daniel Kurz and Martin Steinmann. The Swiss Grand Award for Art / Prix Meret Oppenheim was initiated in 2001 to honour artistic and architectural creativity. The awards distinguish artists, architects, curators and researchers, whose methods and approaches have exerted a lasting influence on our perception and have stimulated cultural dialogue in Switzerland and beyond. 

Review, 25.01.2016

4 things we liked
Looking back at imm cologne

no1: Product designer Sebastian Herkner was selected for Das Haus, the project space for young designers and architects. The ‘open house’ structure was a statement on both our tendencies towards isolated modern living culture and on the current global issues of the refugee and housing crisis. However, instead of it being an overly-political message, Herkner began the dialogue through topics of hospitality, in order to communicate ideas of inclusivity and openness. no2: Herkner’s design interest is well suited to a curiosity about the domestic sphere, and this is something that was explored in his recent collaboration with Colombian-German interiors brand ames, which also launched at imm. The designer worked with several small local manufactories in the countryside of Colombia to create ames sala, a line of modern interior accessories connected to traditional Colombian life. no3: Frankfurt-based brand e15 engaged visitors on another important issue – the impact of copyright infringement on the design world. This was expressed in the 20th anniversary display of their iconic BACKENZAHN stool, a design classic that is included in museums and collections all over the world. In a poignant and playful installation, e15 exhibited replications of the stool over its 20-year existence, stressing the international market for copied products and the necessity for original design. And this idea was brought to life further, with many of the Chinese exhibitors, showing replicated products throughout the fair. no4: Design was also transferred into the art sphere with two exhibitions outside the fair. Berlin-based brand NEW TENDENCY were focused on nurturing emerging talent in their collaboration with Milan and Barcelona-based journal apartamento, where they selected three designers to make an edition of their famous CLICK shelf. At contemporary art gallery Ruttkowski;68, Mike Meiré (Cologne), Nathalie Du Pasquier (Milan) and Ill-Studio (Paris), showed their takes on the shelf. At Kölnischer Kunstverein, designs by Jasper Morrison were shown on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the A&W Designer of the Year award. The survey highlighted Morrison’s long-standing commitment to innovative, globally consciousness design. This example for younger designers to follow was supported by Morrison selecting Swiss designer Michel Charlot for the A&W Mentor Prize.