Feature, 17.03.2017

As you said
Paul Elliman at KW
Mar 18 – May 14, 2017

Paul Elliman Autumn/Winter 2016/17, (2017) Poster campagne, Courtesy the artist

Paul Elliman, Autumn/Winter 2016/17, (2017) Poster campaign, Courtesy the artist

British artist Paul Elliman has consistently engaged with the production and performance of language as a material component of the socially constructed environment. In a world where objects and people are equally subject to the force fields of mass production, Elliman explores the range of human expression as a kind of typography. His exhibition As you said includes various works, both existing and new, that test the boundaries of our communication through letter-like objects, language- like vocal sounds, actions, shapes, silences, and movements of the body. Whether concealed by clothing or techniques of mimicry, our gestures and the desire for language are always within easy reach of the violently communicative raw material of the city. As you said is structured around a set of vitrines devised by the artist Ian Wilson —which Elliman considers as sculptures, objects of display, and sites for discourse—and a pair of billboards. Elliman employs the vitrines as a framing device for a selection of his work from over the last 25 years, while the billboards extend the exhibition out into the streets of Berlin.

Feature, 07.03.2017

Where Lemongrass meets Kohlrabi
Contemporary Thai Cuisine in Berlin

Photos: Robert Rieger

Photos: Robert Rieger

The Grill Royal family has teamed up with artist Rirkrit Tiravanija and chef Dalad Kambhu for their latest restaurant, Kin Dee. Here, contemporary Thai cuisine is served family style – dishes such as whole fried fish or beef stew are plated to share among several people. Lemongrass, kaffir lime, wild ginger, galangal, curcuma, coriander or red chili are essential ingredients. However, whenever possible, the chef and her international team substitute imported products with regional ones from her network of local suppliers. This leads to a modern interpretation of Thai food without sacrificing flavor: sweet apple in place of mango, yellow turnip in place of Asian sweet potato, or pickled kohlrabi in place of papaya. Located in Schöneberg, Kin Dee inherits the former space of the restaurant Edd’s. Out of respect for its history, only small changes and refurbishments have been made to the space. One new addition, though, is the artwork that hangs in the dining room: some of these pieces were created by co-owner Tiravanija, and other were made by artist friends.

Feature, 07.03.2017

‘So an Elephant Walks into a Bar…’:
Frankfurt’s New Concept Bar Bonechina

Placed on a high pedestal at the heart of Frankfurt Alt-Sachsenhausen’s new bar Bonechina is a night-blue, porcelain elephant. Coincidentally, it is also your bartender: tonic water splashes from its mouth. Guests are invited to mix their own drinks, gathering around the sculpture to fill their cups, choose between a sandalwood or Vetiver aromatic ice cube, possibly exchange some names and stories. Developed by the Lindenberg Group, Bonechina is less of a bar than what a bar may dream of. Absent are the bartenders (though two hosts are present to prepare drinks if desired), and gone are the counter, the stools. With a visual concept designed by Studio Aberja, the whole interior glimmers across ceramic tiles called Frankfurter Fliese, diamond-cut and painted in the same shade of blue as the elephant-fountain. The blue continues onto the curtains and upholstery, and above the light limbs of pear-wood furniture, aromatic diffusers let out puffs of yuzu and bergamot throughout the evening. With all of this housed inside a baroque building from the wooden-shingled 18th century, the 20 lucky guests for a night at Bonechina may start to think they’re dreaming too.

Folie1

Photos: Steve Herud

Photos: Steve Herud

Feature, 28.01.2017

Language and Dialogue as a Form of Art — Ian Wilson and Hanne Lippard at the KW Institute for Contemporary Art
Jan 20 – Apr 9, 2017

Hanne Lippard, Flesh, 2016, Installationsansicht KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Courtesy die Künstlerin und LambdaLambdaLambda, Prishtina, Foto: Frank Sperling

Hanne Lippard, Flesh, 2016, installation view KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Courtesy the artist and LambdaLambdaLambda, Prishtina, Photo: Frank Sperling

The reopening of the KW Institute for Contemporary Art is marked by a series of exhibitions reflecting on the work of South African artist Ian Wilson, who explores spoken language as an art form and places great emphasis on dialogue. In Wilson’s non-tangible practice, language morphs into the quintessential vehicle for communication and knowledge. To highlight the importance of his objective in relation to the role of language, three selected artists have been invited to concentrate on different aspects of his artistic output and use them as inspiration for the production of new work. First in line to delve into the topic is Norwegian artist Hanne Lippard with the immersive installation Flesh that takes Wilson’s Statements and Circle Works as its point of departure. Lippard’s physical piece—a spiral staircase leading to a platform—incorporates the artist’s voice which completely encompasses the audience and opens up a world in which ourexperience of language as pure voice is further investigated. Maintaining Wilson’s oeuvre as a guiding framework, Lippard’s exhibition will be followed by artists Adam Pendleton and Paul Elliman.

Ian Wilson, Circle on the floor (Chalk Circle), 1968, unlimitierte Auflage, Courtesy der Künstler und Jan Mot; Ian Wilson, The Pure Awareness of the Absolute / A Discussion, 2014, Courtesy der Künstler und Jan Mot, Brüssel, Leihgabe: Jan Mot, Brüssel; Installationsansicht KW Institute for Contemporary Art, 2017, Foto: Frank Sperling

Ian Wilson, Circle on the floor (Chalk Circle), 1968, unlimited edition, Courtesy the artist and Jan Mot; Ian Wilson, The Pure Awareness of the Absolute / A Discussion, 2014, Courtesy der Künstler und Jan Mot, Brüssel, Loan: Jan Mot, Brüssel; installation view KW Institute for Contemporary Art, 2017, Photo: Frank Sperling

 

Feature, 14.12.2016

KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin

Philippe Van Snick, Dag/Nacht, 1984 – fortlaufend / ongoing Installationsansicht Eingangstor/ Installation view entrance gate, KW Institute for Contemporary Art Foto/Photo: Frank Sperling Courtesy Tatjana Pieters

Philippe Van Snick, Dag/Nacht, 1984 – ongoing. Installation view entrance gate, KW Institute for Contemporary Art
Photo: Frank Sperling, Courtesy Tatjana Pieters

Founded in the early ’90s, in a derelict margarine factory, shortly after the fall of the Berlin Wall, the KW Institute for Contemporary Art has come to be seen as a symbol of Berlin’s artistic development. After 25 years, it continues operating as a lively platform for progressive art practices, and a meeting place specialised in experimental discursive programming. As part of a larger institutional restructuring process under the new directorship of Krist Gruijthuijsen, every part of KW’s 2017 program of exhibitions and events is filtered through the lens of artistic vision. The new program emphasizes dialogue and experimental uses of language, fostering visible exchange between artists and audiences in Berlin, and beyond. Ongoing investigations into singular art practices or thematics form the basis for corresponding commissions and exhibitions. The open-endedness and collaborative nature that lies at the core of the establishment’s mission creates a profoundly inclusionary place that invites numerous voices, and narratives to unfold through its program and the conversations it inspires in its audience. Thus, KW continues to push beyond the confines of the physical building through artistic commissions and events. Inviting artists to interfere with its physical space is an inextricable element of the institute’s approach. One of the most recent site-specific artworks, Philippe Van Snick’s intervention on the entrance gate, complements already existing pieces like Dan Graham’s glass pavilion housing Café Bravo, Renata Lucas’ pavement restructuring outside the main building, as well as the iconic garden by atelier le balto that has returned to the courtyard.

Feature, 28.11.2016

Gonzalez Haase for the Department Store Oberpollinger —
An interior design overhaul of one of Munich’s retail institutions

photo by Thomas Meyer

photo by Thomas Meyer

After commissioning architect John Pawson to plan a comprehensive spatial reimagining, Munich’s luxury department store Oberpollinger enlisted the Berlin-based studio Gonzalez Haase AAS to design the store’s lower level. Consisting of the kidswear, urbanwear and accessories sections, the basement floor is characterised by an interaction of different layers that follow a certain choreography yet remain non-hierarchical and distinguishable as individual. Architecture studio Gonzalez Haase, who in 2003 began designing the first concept stores for Andreas Murkudis across Germany, takes an interdisciplinary approach to architecture by combining elements from art, cinema and scenography into their projects. Always harking back to the origins of a space as a departure point, the duo tries to see the bare substance in each structure to better analyze its profile. In Oberpollinger’s case, they formed clearly readable spaces with simple lighting and raw, almost improvised surfaces. This combination of elements forms cool environs, elegant in shape, with a detached precision—something that corresponds to the duo’s interpretation of the so-called ‘Berlin style’.

photo left: Thomas Meyer / photo right: Pierre Jorge Gonzalez

photo left: Thomas Meyer / photo right: Pierre Jorge Gonzalez

Feature, 18.11.2016

Engaging with current states of emergency
‘Uncertain States’ at Akademie der Künste
Oct 15, 2016 – Jan 15, 2017

Taysir Batniji, Watchtowers, West Bank (2008) Courtesy the artist & Sfeir-Semler Gallery Hamburg/Beirut, Sammlung Zimmermann, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2016 / Akam Shex Hadi, Untitled, Courtesy the artist & Ruya Foundation for Contemporary Culture in Iraq / Richard Mosse Come Out (1966) XXXI (Triple Beam Dreams) (2012), Privatsammlung SVLP © Richard Mosse

Taysir Batniji, Watchtowers, West Bank (2008) Courtesy the artist & Sfeir-Semler Gallery Hamburg/Beirut, Sammlung Zimmermann, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2016 / Akam Shex Hadi, Untitled, Courtesy the artist & Ruya Foundation for Contemporary Culture in Iraq / Richard Mosse Come Out (1966) XXXI (Triple Beam Dreams) (2012), Privatsammlung SVLP © Richard Mosse

 

“A man who wants to lose his self, discovers indeed, the possibilities of human existence, which are infinite, as infinite as is creation. But the recovering of a new personality is as difficult – and as hopeless – as a new creation of the world.” – Hannah Arendt, We Refugees, 1943

Akademie der Künste in Berlin presents Uncertain States, a major group exhibition and multimedia programme of events running until January 15, 2017. Current and historic states of oppression, human migration and cultural dislocation are addressed within a dynamic framework, which has already drawn widespread critical acclaim in Germany. The extensive exhibition programme is a timely exploration of the significance of memory and narrative, within eras of political, social and cultural transformation. Across art, archival ephemera, film, music, performance, talks, pop-up events and practical workshops, the show engages with migrants, thinkers, politicians, writers, artists and activists from across the world, as they confront today’s realities of forced displacement, cultural loss and mass emigration. A historical element of Uncertain States features objects sourced from the Akademie der Künste’s archives of artist émigrés, including cultural icons such as Walter Benjamin, Valeska Gert, Heinrich Mann and Kurt Tucholsky. Their artifacts, rich in memory and cultural identity, form a vibrant narrative when paired with artworks by modern-day artists. In addition to the group exhibition, a rich programme of events seeks to contextualize global political perspectives on migration and identity, within an artistic framework. Talks and panels will debate the topics of migration from the Middle East in particular, addressing themes such as reactionary xenophobia and Islamophobia. Under the banner of “Thinking Space” (Denkraum) a programme of concerts, readings, theatrical performances and symposia, tackle numerous questions surrounding these topics with original and challenging approaches.

Feature, 16.11.2016

Future Architecture Platform –
Exploring new common grounds
and merging innovative ideas in architecture

FAP Homepage foto

 

Initiated in 2014 by the Museum of Architecture and Design in Ljubljana, Future Architecture is the first European platform dedicated to bringing ideas on the future of cities and architecture closer to the public. The initiative unites museums, festivals and producers, and promotes a new generation of creatives through a vibrant programme of outstanding architectural events in a number of European cities. Individuals from various disciplines get the chance to present and apply new ideas on architecture concerning both our current reality and the near future. At the core of the concept lies the question: How can architecture evolve and how should it be shaped moving forward? The aim is to make complex issues of architecture comprehensible to everyone, and nurture a more sustainable living environment.

“Ideas promoted through the Future Architecture Platform show that, for the emerging generation of professionals, architecture is not necessarily an activity whose sole purpose is to build, but rather a field of intellectual research. This generation feels the need to consider all of architecture’s different aspects, to change the understanding of it as a business model, and to re-establish the discipline’s commitment to society. They show architecture as a way of thinking, observation and analysis of the modern world in which we live and operate.” — Matevž Celik, platform leader and director of the Museum of Architecture and Design (MAO), Ljubljana, Slovenia. 

Budding talents within the multifaceted spectrum of architecture explore and share their ideas at exhibitions, workshops, lectures and more. Creatives who apply to the programme are matched to members of different institutions and organisers in order to present innovative ideas in synergy. So far, among a number of different events included in the first year, Something Fantastic’s lectures and conferences at Swiss Architecture Museum Basel,S AM Basel, and CANactions Kiev discussed the design intelligence of arrival cities and the importance of collective spaces. Also, the architecture office Plan Común explored the power of micro-interventions in public spaces with their exhibition “Common Places” in Nove Fužine. And acclaimed writer Jack Self suggested using financial conditions of debt as a design tool to create high-quality and inexpensive homes at S AM Basel.

bildschirmfoto-2016-11-16-um-13-53-38

Feature, 25.10.2016

Iceland’s Cycle Music and Art Festival
Explores Our Notion of Time

Festival Oct 27 – 30, 2016
Exhibition Oct 27 – Dec 18, 2016

AGBAS WELCOME WELCOME WELCOME by Adam Gibbons & boyleANDshaw, 2016 / South Iceland Chamber Choir

AGBAS WELCOME WELCOME WELCOME by Adam Gibbons & boyleANDshaw, 2016 / South Iceland Chamber Choir

Cycle Music and Art Festival serves as an international and local platform for contemporary music and visual arts as well as the coalition of the two fields. Now in its second year, the festival promulgates unconventional works and collaborations, with the goal of deeply engaging the audience and making them reconsider their preconceptions about disciplines and their role as spectators. Acclaimed artists are invited to produce and exhibit work that transcends the boundaries between art and music, classical and popular modes, and audience and performer. That Time, the title of this year’s performance programme and exhibition, will initiate yet another interdisciplinary experiment that will delve into the questions of ‘deep time’ and ‘peak futures’ (the title takes its cue from Samuel Beckett’s eponymous play, parroting the protagonist C: “Never the same after that never quite the same but that was nothing new.”). With an exhibition at Gerðarsafn Kópavogur Art Museum and other venues in Kópavogur, and a rich programme of performances, workshops and concerts, Cycle will promote experimentation, on-site synergies, and will seek to redefine the nature of a traditional art festival. That Time will run until 18 December. 

Berglind Tómasdóttir, photo by Anna María Bogadóttir / Rachel de Joode, Surface Units, 2016

Berglind Tómasdóttir, photo by Anna María Bogadóttir / Rachel de Joode, Surface Units, 2016

Feature, 03.10.2016

Rêveries Urbaines
Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec share their ideal urban settings
Oct 08, 2016 – Jan 22, 2017

Studio Bouroullec

Studio Bouroullec

Internationally renowned industrial designers Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec elucidate their thoughts on urban development and public spaces by presenting a diverse body of work and the results of their ongoing research at the Vitra Fire Station. What can be seen as a wide-ranging study of possible development solutions for cities, the exhibition Rêveries Urbaines seeks to list new forms and concepts that may be imagined in various urban settings. Like glimpsing inside the brothers’ notebooks, the proposed solutions are revealed to visitors as they wander through models and animations, immersing themselves in different scenarios and urban fictions. Unlike the duo’s usual domestic approach to design and focus on the individual, the exhibited proposals solely concentrate on public spaces and the relationship between inhabitant and city. The metamorphosis of spaces through lines, harmony and transparency aims to give a new sense of magic to the places in our cities where we walk, meet and talk. The designers’ “dreamscapes” take into consideration pre-established urban functions and remind us of a new direction in the connection between buildings, the quality of a pavement, where a fountain is situated, the planting of a jungle; all the elements that city dwellers should care about in order to add more charm to the city.

“The exhibition presents our open and abundant research, a ‘pragmatic reverie’ that is designed to exist in public spaces.” – Ronan

“In our work, no project is dedicated to a particular person or place. The exhibition brings together propositions for developing public spaces that have an element of abstraction. They reply to a question that is not completely clear. It is in this vacuum that? our propositions could be potentially re-imagined on site.” – Erwan