Feature, 12.04.2017

The Anti-Museum
An anthology devoted to a radical artistic engagement

book cover and Marcel Broodthaers with camel in front of Palais des Beaux-Arts de Bruxelles © Maria Gilissen

book cover and Marcel Broodthaers with camel in front of Palais des Beaux-Arts de Bruxelles © Maria Gilissen

“Museums should be invisible. With an imaginary museum you can do whatever you want.” –
Maurizio Cattelan

What does the term anti-art encompass? It’s shaped by an array of concepts that reject prior definitions of art and question the art system and how it functions. “The Anti-Museum“, an extensive anthology by Mathieu Copeland and Balthazar Lovay, addresses the idea of anti-art through numerous contributions by renowned artists and writers. From interviews and historical reprints to manifestos and commissioned essays, the 794-page encyclopaedic tome presents the first comprehensive exploration of the radical and paradoxical concept that is the ‘anti-museum’ – a term so present in art history and yet one that has never been the object of detailed investigation. The museum has always been a target for criticism, whether it comes from artists, thinkers, curators, or even the public. Dedicated to all forms of “anti” such as Anti-Art, Anti-Technology, Anti-Design and Anti-Philosophy, the publication features numerous texts from the 60s until today – including newly commissioned as well as never-before-translated pieces – to define the idea of anti-art in a broad sense, evoking attempts to disrupt rules and customs in artistic disciplines.

Feature, 07.03.2017

Where Lemongrass meets Kohlrabi
Contemporary Thai Cuisine in Berlin

Photos: Robert Rieger

Photos: Robert Rieger

The Grill Royal family has teamed up with artist Rirkrit Tiravanija and chef Dalad Kambhu for their latest restaurant, Kin Dee. Here, contemporary Thai cuisine is served family style – dishes such as whole fried fish or beef stew are plated to share among several people. Lemongrass, kaffir lime, wild ginger, galangal, curcuma, coriander or red chili are essential ingredients. However, whenever possible, the chef and her international team substitute imported products with regional ones from her network of local suppliers. This leads to a modern interpretation of Thai food without sacrificing flavor: sweet apple in place of mango, yellow turnip in place of Asian sweet potato, or pickled kohlrabi in place of papaya. Located in Schöneberg, Kin Dee inherits the former space of the restaurant Edd’s. Out of respect for its history, only small changes and refurbishments have been made to the space. One new addition, though, is the artwork that hangs in the dining room: some of these pieces were created by co-owner Tiravanija, and other were made by artist friends.

Feature, 07.03.2017

‘So an Elephant Walks into a Bar…’:
Frankfurt’s New Concept Bar Bonechina

Placed on a high pedestal at the heart of Frankfurt Alt-Sachsenhausen’s new bar Bonechina is a night-blue, porcelain elephant. Coincidentally, it is also your bartender: tonic water splashes from its mouth. Guests are invited to mix their own drinks, gathering around the sculpture to fill their cups, choose between a sandalwood or Vetiver aromatic ice cube, possibly exchange some names and stories. Developed by the Lindenberg Group, Bonechina is less of a bar than what a bar may dream of. Absent are the bartenders (though two hosts are present to prepare drinks if desired), and gone are the counter, the stools. With a visual concept designed by Studio Aberja, the whole interior glimmers across ceramic tiles called Frankfurter Fliese, diamond-cut and painted in the same shade of blue as the elephant-fountain. The blue continues onto the curtains and upholstery, and above the light limbs of pear-wood furniture, aromatic diffusers let out puffs of yuzu and bergamot throughout the evening. With all of this housed inside a baroque building from the wooden-shingled 18th century, the 20 lucky guests for a night at Bonechina may start to think they’re dreaming too.

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Photos: Steve Herud

Photos: Steve Herud

Project, 06.12.2016

Einstein unter den Linden —
Berlin’s iconic coffeehouse and restaurant
under new direction

right photo: Stefan Korte

There aren’t many places that manage to retain their quality and appeal while standing the test of time in the ever-changing landscape of Berlin. One of those select few is the coffeehouse and restaurant Einstein unter den Linden in Mitte, serving classic Austrian cuisine at its very best. Staying true to its identity, the house is a timeless meeting point that opens its doors to eager breakfasters as early as 7am and keeps on going until well after dark. Now, under the direction of the Grill Royal group, the famed establishment is resuscitating the allure of its early days. Breakfast and lunch staples are joined by an evening menu as well as fine wine and plat du jour assortments. Marinated cap of rump, breaded fried chicken with potato salad and Viennese schnitzel with parsley potatoes, cranberries and cucumber salad are just a handful of the delectable highlights. With respect for the original charm of the house, the interior has been carefully renovated and furnished. Known for its iconic frame-covered walls, the revived decoration now focuses on original photographs by Robert Lebeck and Susanne Shapovalow as well as works by contemporary artists. Under the Linden trees, Einstein maintains the perfect blend of dignified and intimate as a standing bastion of the area’s formerly rich cultural fabric. The atmosphere is a testament to the flair of a bygone era with an amalgam of politicians, bohemians and intelligentsia found mingling in one place. From new and old Berliners to tourists and all kinds of flaneurs, Einstein is where all paths converge.

Feature, 18.11.2016

Engaging with current states of emergency
‘Uncertain States’ at Akademie der Künste
Oct 15, 2016 – Jan 15, 2017

Taysir Batniji, Watchtowers, West Bank (2008) Courtesy the artist & Sfeir-Semler Gallery Hamburg/Beirut, Sammlung Zimmermann, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2016 / Akam Shex Hadi, Untitled, Courtesy the artist & Ruya Foundation for Contemporary Culture in Iraq / Richard Mosse Come Out (1966) XXXI (Triple Beam Dreams) (2012), Privatsammlung SVLP © Richard Mosse

Taysir Batniji, Watchtowers, West Bank (2008) Courtesy the artist & Sfeir-Semler Gallery Hamburg/Beirut, Sammlung Zimmermann, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2016 / Akam Shex Hadi, Untitled, Courtesy the artist & Ruya Foundation for Contemporary Culture in Iraq / Richard Mosse Come Out (1966) XXXI (Triple Beam Dreams) (2012), Privatsammlung SVLP © Richard Mosse

 

“A man who wants to lose his self, discovers indeed, the possibilities of human existence, which are infinite, as infinite as is creation. But the recovering of a new personality is as difficult – and as hopeless – as a new creation of the world.” – Hannah Arendt, We Refugees, 1943

Akademie der Künste in Berlin presents Uncertain States, a major group exhibition and multimedia programme of events running until January 15, 2017. Current and historic states of oppression, human migration and cultural dislocation are addressed within a dynamic framework, which has already drawn widespread critical acclaim in Germany. The extensive exhibition programme is a timely exploration of the significance of memory and narrative, within eras of political, social and cultural transformation. Across art, archival ephemera, film, music, performance, talks, pop-up events and practical workshops, the show engages with migrants, thinkers, politicians, writers, artists and activists from across the world, as they confront today’s realities of forced displacement, cultural loss and mass emigration. A historical element of Uncertain States features objects sourced from the Akademie der Künste’s archives of artist émigrés, including cultural icons such as Walter Benjamin, Valeska Gert, Heinrich Mann and Kurt Tucholsky. Their artifacts, rich in memory and cultural identity, form a vibrant narrative when paired with artworks by modern-day artists. In addition to the group exhibition, a rich programme of events seeks to contextualize global political perspectives on migration and identity, within an artistic framework. Talks and panels will debate the topics of migration from the Middle East in particular, addressing themes such as reactionary xenophobia and Islamophobia. Under the banner of “Thinking Space” (Denkraum) a programme of concerts, readings, theatrical performances and symposia, tackle numerous questions surrounding these topics with original and challenging approaches.

Project, 18.10.2016

Crossing Geographical and Cultural Borders
The Veddel Embassy in Venice
Oct 18 – 22, 2016

On the occasion of the 15th International Architecture exhibition in Venice, the Goethe-Institut organised the program Performing Architecture comprising five projects that are closely connected to this year’s exhibition in the German Pavilion. Merging architecture, choreography and the performing arts, the series of events seeks to address a set of pressing questions. How does a multicultural society change a city? How do people with diverse cultural, religious, social and political backgrounds encounter one another, and how can they all make an adopted city their shared home? The focal point of this year’s programme is the project “The Veddel Embassy: Representing Germany”. The temporary embassy will bring the migratory, multicultural reality of the Hamburg district of Veddel to Venice to offer a space for discourse and cultural exchange. What used to be the departure point for German emigrants in the past, is now an arrival quarter. All migration movements of the last 70 years have passed through the area of Veddel; immigrants from over sixty different countries have been living here for generations in peaceful coexistence, forming a new society. Around 60 inhabitants of the small island in the river Elbe will come to Venice for a week and invite everyone to become part of an enriching process. The Veddel Embassy will turn into a place of enlightening encounters. Delving into the reality of life on Veddel conveys an idea of what the future holds for Germany as an immigration country. In Venice, the residents present their projects, ideas, ideals, and their home in order to form a substantial discussion with both the international guests of the Biennale as well as with the multicultural citizens of Venice.

Project, 12.10.2016

Weltentwerfen – Friedrich von Borries

weltentwerfen

Leseprobe
Entwerfen ist das Gegenteil von Unterwerfen. Entwerfen. Unterwerfen. Alles, was gestaltet ist, unterwirft uns unter seine Bedingungen. Gleichzeitig befreit uns das Gestaltete aus dem Zustand der Unterwerfung, der Unterworfenheit. Design schafft Freiheit, Design ermöglicht Handlungen, die zuvor nicht möglich oder nicht denkbar waren. Indem es dies tut, begrenzt es aber auch den Möglichkeitsraum, weil es neue Bedingungen schafft. Alles, was gestaltet ist, entwirft und unterwirft. Design ist von dieser sich bedingenden und ausschließenden Gegensätzlichkeit grundlegend geprägt. Diese dem Design inhärente Dichotomie ist nicht nur eine gestalterische, sondern eine politische. Sie bedingt Freiheit und Unfreiheit, Macht und Ohnmacht, Unterdrückung und Widerstand. Sie ist das politische Wesen von Design.

Das Buch erscheint am 29.10.2016 bei edition suhrkamp

Project, 01.10.2016

Forecast: The next generation
of creative thinkers and influencers
Open call Oct 01 – Nov 30, 2016

Forecast mentors

Forecast mentors

Supporting pioneering ideas is at the core of Forecast, an international platform that calls on creative minds from diverse fields to submit their proposals and collaborate with six highly esteemed mentors. Now in its second edition, Forecast encourages public discussions on the ideas of the future and offers fertile ground for the growth of outstanding projects. Thus, a shared space to come together and exchange views is created, within which synergetic efforts bring forth innovation. The platform and its accompanying festival transcend the boundaries of disciplines to provide insight into creative production processes, and make room for the questions that are on the minds of the next generation of trailblazers. Until 30 November, creative minds from anywhere in the world working in various disciplines are urged to submit their proposals for consideration. Thirty finalists will discuss their ideas and present them to the public at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW) during the Forecast Forum in March 2017. At the end of the forum, the six mentors will each select one concept, which they will accompany to fruition. Finally, the outcome of these collaborations will be presented during October 2017, at the Forecast Festival at the HKW.

Project, 13.06.2016

I Never Read, Art Book Fair Basel
Jun 15 – 18, 2016 at Kaserne Basel

 

nothing at the moment by Humboldtbooks, Milan

nothing at the moment by Humboldtbooks, Milan

 

What started as a platform for experimental publishing and singular editions straddling the line between art object and reading material, has now become an integral part of the annual Art Week Basel. The art book fair I Never Read, Art Book Fair Basel now in its fifth edition, invites more than a hundred publishers, authors and artists from numerous countries to display their printed matter spanning the fields of art, photography, graphic design and architecture. An ever-growing selection of exhibitors introduces visitors to artists’ books, monographs, periodicals and zines, as well as out-of-print editions and collector’s items. Showing how the print world can evolve and thrive instead of dissolving into the shadow cast by the digital world (as many pseudo-evangelists were too quick to proclaim), the fair is an ode to the book as a democratic art form and an approachable medium for creative expression. What’s thoroughly explored here is the role of contemporary publishing in an increasingly on-screen era and how the art book provides a haven for artistic practice and how it builds a less market-driven community.

Feature, 09.06.2016

A Casa di Iris Roth
Ceramic & Interior Designer in Milan

inside the studio of Iris Roth
Studio visit with Iris Roth in Milan

On the occasion of Salone del Mobile 2016, we paid a visit to ceramic and interior designer Iris Roth to gain insight into her working space and creative practice. In her charming apartment, located in the well-known architects’ building complex Cascia 6, the Italian-German artist hosts dinners, grows olive trees on her sunny terrace and works away in her compact studio. We also got a chance to peek inside her production space – a traditional ceramics atelier that has been supervised by an Italian couple since 1976. Iris Roth combines traditional craftsmanship with contemporary elements: simple forms, warm tones and traditional processes involving the potter’s wheel as an essential tool. The artist uses white clay coated in natural white or grey glazes, as well as the widely used red clay – prevalent in her nude collection. Small, intentional imperfections on the surfaces of handmade objects, such as the artisan’s fingerprints, give each item a unique character that distinguishes them from mass-produced ware. But aesthetics aside, it’s all about functionality: All objects are suitable for everyday use and are dishwasher-safe. For Louis Pretty in Berlin and the restaurant oTTo in Milan, Iris Roth has designed and produced their entire ceramic lines. Each of the pieces is unparallelled but the designs can be produced in large numbers. In addition to oTTo’s dinnerware, Iris also designed the interiors of the cosy, greenhouse-like bistro, which arguably offers the best sandwiches in town. Soon, Iris Roth’s pieces will be available online – till then make sure to follow her dolce vita on Instagram.