Project, 04.04.2017

Design Display #4: Between MXN and the US
Two projects consider socio-political questions
Mar 30 – Jul 30, 2017

Carla-Fernandez © Inka & Niclas / Border-City © FR-EE

Vestido Cobra. Photo: Edgar Aguirre © Carla Fernández / Border-City © FR-EE

 

With the aim to stimulate discussion on the social dimensions of design, the 4th edition of the Design Display series at Autostadt Wolfsburg (Konzernforum) takes Mexico as its main point of departure. Inside the exhibition’s characteristic 20-metre-long glass display, an intercultural bridge between Mexico and the US is figuratively built through two contemporary designer projects. On the one side is Vestido Cobra, a dress created by Mexican fashion designer Carla Fernández who explores how fashion can uphold traditions and still point the way to the future. By bringing Mexican styles and manufacturing techniques into contemporary fashion, she draws attention to the cultural heritage of her homeland within a modern context. The unisex “snake dress” questions gender roles and embraces craftsmanship. On the other side of the glass display is a multimedia installation dealing with the US-Mexican border by architect Fernando Romero. Conceived as an ideal metropolis with multiple urban centres, Romero’s Border City is a bi-national future city designed to straddle the controversial border, serving as a model for new cities around the world. Romero’s visionary project explores the potential to create organized growth and multiple urban centres in sprawling regions lacking infrastructure.
The exhibition’s accompanying magazine On Display continues the discussion through features on the work of the two participating designers, a detailed piece about the border area between Mexico and the United States, and an essay on the influence of traditional craftsmanship on modern Mexican design.

Feature, 28.03.2017

The Power of the Arts – Open Call
Fostering social equality through arts and culture

 

Anton Unai for The Power of the Arts © Philip Morris GmbH

Anton Unai for The Power of the Arts © Philip Morris GmbH

As an active response to the social challenges of our times, a new creative initiative advocates for the seamless integration and inclusion of people with a refugee and migration background in Germany through the arts, music, theater, and dance. One in five people in Germany have a migratory history, two-thirds of which belong to the first generation. We don’t always celebrate the same festivities. We don’t always speak the same language. We don’t always believe in the same deity. But it’s undeniable that the world of the arts can act as an equalizing and unifying resource, and that’s the direction we should be moving towards to. With The Power of the Arts initiative, launched by the Philip Morris GmbH, each year an independent jury selects four winning projects, awarded with 50,000 euros each, put forward by non-profit institutions and creative artists. All participants use numerous artistic disciplines to endorse social and cultural equality as well as deeper understanding among individuals. What serves as the main purpose of the initiative is to encourage an open, interculturally shaped society that leaves no room for discrimination and marginalization. Creativity and people’s abilities are invested in coexistence and collaborative progress.
Project submissions and information on the call for applications from 27 March until 9 June 2017.

Feature, 17.03.2017

As you said
Paul Elliman at KW
Mar 18 – May 14, 2017

Paul Elliman Autumn/Winter 2016/17, (2017) Poster campagne, Courtesy the artist

Paul Elliman, Autumn/Winter 2016/17, (2017) Poster campaign, Courtesy the artist

British artist Paul Elliman has consistently engaged with the production and performance of language as a material component of the socially constructed environment. In a world where objects and people are equally subject to the force fields of mass production, Elliman explores the range of human expression as a kind of typography. His exhibition As you said includes various works, both existing and new, that test the boundaries of our communication through letter-like objects, language- like vocal sounds, actions, shapes, silences, and movements of the body. Whether concealed by clothing or techniques of mimicry, our gestures and the desire for language are always within easy reach of the violently communicative raw material of the city. As you said is structured around a set of vitrines devised by the artist Ian Wilson —which Elliman considers as sculptures, objects of display, and sites for discourse—and a pair of billboards. Elliman employs the vitrines as a framing device for a selection of his work from over the last 25 years, while the billboards extend the exhibition out into the streets of Berlin.

Feature, 07.03.2017

Where Lemongrass meets Kohlrabi
Contemporary Thai Cuisine in Berlin

Photos: Robert Rieger

Photos: Robert Rieger

The Grill Royal family has teamed up with artist Rirkrit Tiravanija and chef Dalad Kambhu for their latest restaurant, Kin Dee. Here, contemporary Thai cuisine is served family style – dishes such as whole fried fish or beef stew are plated to share among several people. Lemongrass, kaffir lime, wild ginger, galangal, curcuma, coriander or red chili are essential ingredients. However, whenever possible, the chef and her international team substitute imported products with regional ones from her network of local suppliers. This leads to a modern interpretation of Thai food without sacrificing flavor: sweet apple in place of mango, yellow turnip in place of Asian sweet potato, or pickled kohlrabi in place of papaya. Located in Schöneberg, Kin Dee inherits the former space of the restaurant Edd’s. Out of respect for its history, only small changes and refurbishments have been made to the space. One new addition, though, is the artwork that hangs in the dining room: some of these pieces were created by co-owner Tiravanija, and other were made by artist friends.

Feature, 07.03.2017

‘So an Elephant Walks into a Bar…’:
Frankfurt’s New Concept Bar Bonechina

Placed on a high pedestal at the heart of Frankfurt Alt-Sachsenhausen’s new bar Bonechina is a night-blue, porcelain elephant. Coincidentally, it is also your bartender: tonic water splashes from its mouth. Guests are invited to mix their own drinks, gathering around the sculpture to fill their cups, choose between a sandalwood or Vetiver aromatic ice cube, possibly exchange some names and stories. Developed by the Lindenberg Group, Bonechina is less of a bar than what a bar may dream of. Absent are the bartenders (though two hosts are present to prepare drinks if desired), and gone are the counter, the stools. With a visual concept designed by Studio Aberja, the whole interior glimmers across ceramic tiles called Frankfurter Fliese, diamond-cut and painted in the same shade of blue as the elephant-fountain. The blue continues onto the curtains and upholstery, and above the light limbs of pear-wood furniture, aromatic diffusers let out puffs of yuzu and bergamot throughout the evening. With all of this housed inside a baroque building from the wooden-shingled 18th century, the 20 lucky guests for a night at Bonechina may start to think they’re dreaming too.

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Photos: Steve Herud

Photos: Steve Herud

Project, 02.03.2017

Transformation of Berinson´s exhibition space
by Gonzalez Haase AAS

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Galerie Berinson newly housed in an apartment of a historic Gründerzeit building in Charlottenburg. Gonzalez Haase AAS, which designed the interior of the former gallery in Kreuzberg, has travelled west with them. With its parquet floors, stucco-work molding around the ceilings, and a pre-modern floorplan, the new venue is a radically different space than Berinson’s open loft-format from before. To contrast the old-fashioned feel, the architects have remodeled the space with a sense of rigor, simplicity, and clarity. All the built-in walls that weren’t a part of the building’s load-bearing structure were removed, creating an even circulation through the gallery. At the head of its main hallway is an office space with an exposed storage area; along the hall’s other side are entrances to the three exhibition spaces. In line with the architectural concept, the original connections between these exhibition rooms – double doors in the middle of the walls – have been closed up and replaced by neutral openings. Finally, a system of cool lighting from bold, metallic track fixtures is installed in strict parallel to the main axis of the apartment, two in the hallway and two running through the exhibition rooms. These additions are of a characteristic style for Gonzalez and Haase, and serve to unify Galerie Berinson’s new home: the fixtures become a part of the architecture itself, separating and organizing space through their form, size and design.

Project, 24.02.2017

Adam Pendleton
at KW Institute for Contemporary Art
Feb 24 – May 14, 2017

A woman on the train asks angela davis for an autograph, 2016. Courtesy the artist and Pace Gallery, New York / Adam Pendleton IF THE FUNCTION OF WRITING, 2017, detail, Courtesy the artist and Galeria Pedro Cera, Lisbon

Adam Pendleton: A woman on the train asks angela davis for an autograph, 2016. Courtesy the artist and Pace Gallery, New York /  IF THE FUNCTION OF WRITING, 2017, detail. Courtesy the artist and Galeria Pedro Cera, Lisbon

 

Adam Pendleton‘s multi-disciplinary practice engages with language and the reframing of history, and he follows Hanne Lippard as the second of three artists to present exhibitions reflecting on the work of Ian Wilson. Beginning his practice as a painter, Wilson increasingly took on communication, abstraction, and the nature of knowledge as subjects, and used dialogue as a form. As a response, Pendleton stages an intervention to the entire third floor of KW. Cutting across the exhibition space is a diagonal wall, across which is printed the first sentence of Ron Sillman’s poem “Albany” – “If the function of writing is to ‘express the world.’” This statement, or question, is met with an arrangement of posters, collages, and other archival materials from Pendleton’s practice, pasted in successive layers and constrained to a black-and-white palette. And Wilson’s voice is present in the midst: shot him in the face includes one of his monochromatic paintings, with which the artist aimed for producing an object devoid of referential content and touching true abstraction. As part of KW’s The Weekends agenda, three of Pendleton’s film works will also be showing at the Babylon cinema. All showcase Pendleton’s focus on the themes of portraiture, artistic exchange, and methods of representation – filmic and otherwise.

 

WE (we are not successive), 2015 Siebdrucktinte auf spiegelpoliertem Edelstahl / Silkscreen ink on mirror polished stainless steel Courtesy der Ku?nstler / the artist, und / and Pace Gallery, New York (US)

WE (we are not successive), 2015. Courtesy the artist and Pace Gallery, New York

Project, 13.02.2017

Hello, Robot
Design between Human and Machine
at Vitra Design Museum
Feb 10 – May 14, 2017

 

Yonezawa, »Directional Robot«, 1957. Private collection. Photo: Andreas Sütterlin

Yonezawa, »Directional Robot«, 1957. Private collection. Photo: Andreas Sütterlin

 

When science fiction scenarios are applied to reality: How is robotics changing our lives and what is design’s role within that spectrum? As these technological advancements have found their way into our everyday environs, design has a central responsibility in this process, for it is designers who shape the interfaces between humans and machines. The exhibition Hello, Robot at the Vitra Design Museum examines the current robotics boom from the scope of various disciplines in extensive detail for the first time. Comprising more than 200 exhibits, the exhibition includes robots used in the home, in nursing care, and in industry as well as computer games, media installations, and relevant examples in films and literature. Through this sweeping analysis, the show broadens our awareness of the associated ethical, social, and political issues that arise. As our environment is becoming ever smarter and more autonomous, Hello Robot initiates a necessary discussion on how design cultivates the relationship between human and machine. Accompanying the exhibition, an extensive programme of talks, films, performances, and workshops further illuminates the topic in question from a number of different perspectives.

 

Shawn Maximo, »Going Green«, Vinylprint 2016 © Shawn Maximo / TRNDlabs, »SKEYE Nano 2 FPV Drone«, 2015 Fernsteuerung und Nano-Drohne © TRNDlabs

Shawn Maximo, »Going Green«, Vinylprint 2016 © Shawn Maximo / TRNDlabs, »SKEYE Nano 2 FPV Drone«, 2015 Fernsteuerung und Nano-Drohne © TRNDlabs

Feature, 28.01.2017

Language and Dialogue as a Form of Art — Ian Wilson and Hanne Lippard at the KW Institute for Contemporary Art
Jan 20 – Apr 9, 2017

Hanne Lippard, Flesh, 2016, Installationsansicht KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Courtesy die Künstlerin und LambdaLambdaLambda, Prishtina, Foto: Frank Sperling

Hanne Lippard, Flesh, 2016, installation view KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Courtesy the artist and LambdaLambdaLambda, Prishtina, Photo: Frank Sperling

The reopening of the KW Institute for Contemporary Art is marked by a series of exhibitions reflecting on the work of South African artist Ian Wilson, who explores spoken language as an art form and places great emphasis on dialogue. In Wilson’s non-tangible practice, language morphs into the quintessential vehicle for communication and knowledge. To highlight the importance of his objective in relation to the role of language, three selected artists have been invited to concentrate on different aspects of his artistic output and use them as inspiration for the production of new work. First in line to delve into the topic is Norwegian artist Hanne Lippard with the immersive installation Flesh that takes Wilson’s Statements and Circle Works as its point of departure. Lippard’s physical piece—a spiral staircase leading to a platform—incorporates the artist’s voice which completely encompasses the audience and opens up a world in which ourexperience of language as pure voice is further investigated. Maintaining Wilson’s oeuvre as a guiding framework, Lippard’s exhibition will be followed by artists Adam Pendleton and Paul Elliman.

Ian Wilson, Circle on the floor (Chalk Circle), 1968, unlimitierte Auflage, Courtesy der Künstler und Jan Mot; Ian Wilson, The Pure Awareness of the Absolute / A Discussion, 2014, Courtesy der Künstler und Jan Mot, Brüssel, Leihgabe: Jan Mot, Brüssel; Installationsansicht KW Institute for Contemporary Art, 2017, Foto: Frank Sperling

Ian Wilson, Circle on the floor (Chalk Circle), 1968, unlimited edition, Courtesy the artist and Jan Mot; Ian Wilson, The Pure Awareness of the Absolute / A Discussion, 2014, Courtesy der Künstler und Jan Mot, Brüssel, Loan: Jan Mot, Brüssel; installation view KW Institute for Contemporary Art, 2017, Photo: Frank Sperling

 

Project, 27.01.2017

Das Numen Meatus –
Scientific Data morphs into a Sonic Experience
Jan 27 – Mar 11, 2017

Das Numen Meatus, 2016, courtesy Das Numen and DITTRICH & SCHLECHTRIEM, Berlin

Das Numen Meatus, 2016, courtesy Das Numen and Dittrich & Schlechtriem, Berlin

 

After relocating to a more spacious venue right behind the Volksbühne, the Dittrich & Schlechtriem gallery inaugurates its new home with an installation by the Berlin-based artist collective Das Numen, made up of artists Julian Charrière, Andreas Greiner, Markus Hoffmann, and Felix Kiessling. The collective’s practice is premised on the methodological primacy of experimentation and the significance of engaging with their surroundings and the present moment. Entitled Das Numen Meatus, the exhibition focuses on sonic compositions and the importance of atmosphere for their existence. Something intangible and ephemeral fills the gallery’s rooms: sounds emerge, produced by an array of pipes suspended in the space. Das Numen feed readings—wind velocities and directions—from twenty weather stations into a computer program that converts the data into impulses. The latter in turn control valves that allow compressed air to pass through the pipes, which begin to sound. Scientific data that, due to its enormous quantity, often goes unused is transformed into sensual sounds and a curious aesthetic experience.