Project, 21.09.2018

BNKR | SPACE IS THE PLACE (1/4):
Thresholds. Limits of Space
Sept 13–Dec 9, 2018

Web_BNKRAndrea Fraser, Little Frank and His Carp, 2001 © The artist, Galerie Nagel Draxler | Jeewi Lee, Einschlag © The artist | Raul Watch, Eureka, 2015 © The artist | Wermke / Leinkauf, Überwindungsübungen, 2015 © Wermke / Leinkauf
The exhibition cycle SPACE IS THE PLACE starts with the group exhibition Thresholds. Limits of Space. Based on Bruce Nauman’s seminal work Body Pressure (1974) which provides a set of typed out instructions for merging their bodies with an architectural surface, the exhibition explores the corporal-spatial unit of critically experiencing space through the works of different generations of artists. In her ingenious single channel video performance entitled Little Frank and His Carp (2001), the American artist Andrea Fraser is for example seen walking around the atrium of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao listening to the institution’s official audio guide, which culminates in an equally ironic and erotic encounter between the artist and the architecture. Wermke/Leinkauf investigate the surmounting of architectures in Berlin’s former border area in a 6-channel slide projection. Here, archive images from 1974/75 depicting East German border troops simulating an escape at a so called “Lehrgrenze“ (“training border“) serve as source material for the German artist duo. The work reflects upon the former border situation and deals in a playful way with history, freedom and memory. With new in-situ works Jeewi Lee and Raul Walch also dedicate themselves to artistic conquest of spatial borderlines in interior and exterior spaces. Jeewi Lee’s Einschlag (“Impact”) ingeniously inverts the actual purpose of a wrecking ball as an instrument to bring down walls and demolish buildings. Hanging from the ceiling of the former bomb shelter, the wrecking ball appears as if after an act of destruction. Obvious traces of deformation caused by the inner walls of the exhibition space show on the wrecking ball and not as originally preconceived. Here, the wrecking ball itself becomes a metaphorical depiction of the brutal history of the WWII bunker. Raul Walch takes the discourse into the urban realm with a series of work entitled Eureka. In Berlin and Munich, Walch transforms city hydrants in the surrounding urban environment into ephemeral fountains.