Feature, 02.11.2014

STEPHEN WILLATS – BERLIN LOCAL
MD72
08.11. – 20.12.14

Berlin Local is a reiteration of Stephen Willats’ view that the art gallery can operate in a different way, and intends to stress the local – the importance of community and neighborhood as a focus for art practice. Involving interdisciplinary methods deriving from sociology, cybernetics, semiotics and philosophy in his work since the late 1950’s, Willats has developed an interactive, collaborative practice that explores art as a social phenomenon. He assigns the public/audience the role of observer and participant and uses their urban everyday as a site of investigation. For Berlin Local, Willats involved a couple who runs an antiquarian bookshop and a woman who runs a market garden in the immediate neighbourhood of MD72. Over eight months, Willats worked with the participants to engage with their social relationship and their own creative potential and perception of their environment. Interviews, photographic and film material, signs and symbols which surround the participants in their everyday life are streamed together in the form of films and diagrammatic panels. The result is a series of works presented as installations at the MD72 space, the book shop and garden, and also at an Italian restaurant and a car showroom, both reminiscent of West Berlin times. A map showing the sites of the installations around the MD72 accompanies the exhibition, emphasizing the neighbourhood connections that are an essential part of the work. To coincide with Berlin Local at MD72, the daadgalerie is staging the exhibition How Tomorrow Looks From Here by Stephen Willats, featuring works on the themes of the model, simulation, and interaction.

Credit: Stephen Willats, Berlin Local, 2014, Courtesy of the artist and MD72, Berlin

Credit: Stephen Willats, Berlin Local, 2014, Courtesy of the artist and MD72, Berlin

MD72

Feature, 01.11.2014

PHILIPPE PARRENO – HOW CAN WE TELL THE DANCERS FROM THE DANCE
Schinkel Pavillon
15.11. – 21.12.2014

How Can We Tell the Dancers from the Dance presents the visitor with a haunting sensory experience: a white dance floor occupies the space of the Schinkel Pavilion, from which the ghostly sounds of invisible dancers echo – footsteps and footfalls taken from movements choreographed by the late Merce Cunningham, and performed by dancers of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company. Around the dance floor, a wall is continuously turning. Throughout his practice, French artist Philippe Parreno has fundamentally redefined the exhibition experience by exploring its possibilities as a coherent ‘object’ and a medium in its own right, rather than as a collection of individual works. To this end, he conceives his shows as a scripted space where a series of events unfold. His exhibition at Schinkel Pavillon resonates with the concentric architectural structure of the glass pavilion and delineates the space’s expanses and proportions by performing a choreography of its own. Recorded in New York in 2012, the dance movements that appear as aural revenants of the dancers’ bodies were selected from five different choreographies by Cunningham. As like Cunningham Parreno is fascinated by the potential to create structure via the incorporation of random phenomena. In his work, the method of chance allows the boundaries of the artwork to evolve and change over time, permitting it to almost take on a life of its own. Simultaneous with How Can We Tell the Dancers from the Dance, gallery Esther Schipper will present Philippe Parreno’s solo exhibition quasi-objects.

Credit: Philippe?Parreno,?How Can We Tell the Dancers from the Dance,?2013, Courtesy:?The?artist?and?Esther?Schipper,?Berlin, Photo:?©?Andrea?Rossetti

Credit: Philippe Parreno, How Can We Tell the Dancers from the Dance, 2013, Courtesy: The artist and Esther Schipper, Berlin, Photo: © Andrea Rossetti

SCHINKEL PAVILLON

Feature, 01.11.2014

IN EXTENSO: ERWEITERT – PUBLIC SPACE
Céline Poulin in conversation with Jean-Pascal Flavien and Markus Miessen at DAZ Berlin
27.11.2014

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Y-table at DAZ, Photo: Gerhard Haug © Institut francais

How does the work of art or architecture interact with the multitude of voices that construct public space? How does this discursive context influence the relationship between artist, architect and participatory public? And what is its effect on the actors themselves? To explore these correlations between language and space curator Céline Poulin invites artist Jean-Pascal Flavien and architect Markus Miessen for the third In Extenso – Erweitert interdisciplinary panel discussion, continuing the project’s open and ongoing exchange between curators, invited artists, architects, and thinkers from France and Germany.

IN EXTENSO, DAZ BERLIN, STUDIO MIESSEN

Feature, 13.10.2014

BERLIN GUIDE CEE CEE BERLIN

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© Cee Cee Berlin

Beginning as an email newsletter for friends, the Cee Cee weekly guide has become a staple in multi-faceted Berlin city life. Every Thursday, five recommendations are sent to subscribers, highlighting inspiring places, food, culture, design, art and events, accompanied by a guest contribution of people from all walks of life recommending places and things they like. Among them: fashion designer Hien Le who recommended his favourite restaurant, and New York Times correspondent Gisela Williams, who introduced the literary lounge at Soho House Berlin. The best of the Cee Cee newsletters have now been compiled into a book including old and new guest entries. Chapters are uniquely separated by specific search themes, marked in individual colors and thus easily located on the foldable map that comes with the book. The map is meant to accompany and navigate the reader throughout the city.

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Photo: Schinkel Pavillon | Tempelhof, Photo: Andreas Alexander Bohlender

CEE CEE BERLIN, DISTANZ VERLAG, HIEN LE, SOHO HOUSE BERLIN

Feature, 09.09.2014

THE ACADEMY OF ART AND DESIGN FHNW RELOCATES TO DREISPITZ
HGK FHNW, Dreispitz-Areal, Basel, Schwitzerland

At the heart of an evolving, urbane, inner-city district, the Academy of Art and Design FHNW opens a new campus. Including converted studio spaces and a new high rise, all of the school’s institutes, which were previously located throughout Basel, will finally be brought together in the Dreispitz complex. Through the spatial concentration of the departments in a joint Campus of the Arts, knowledge and experience can now be widely shared and also centrally pooled. New initiatives will foster this interdisciplinary and intercultural orientation of the Campus: for example, an experimental platform for contemporary artistic positions (Curating the Campus), an initiative linking areas of knowledge, other activities, and current discourses on the themes of design confronted with today’s environmental challenges (Design Platform Basel), and a knowledge based, interactive digital platform that will connect theory, research, and artistic and design practice (Digital Campus). On the occasion of its degree show, the Academy for Art and Design FHNW will open its doors to a preview of the new building complex in mid-September, and will celebrate the area’s official opening by the end of October.

Photos: Kambiz Shafei and Hans-Peter Huser

Photos: Kambiz Shafei and Hans-Peter Huser

HGK FHNWCAMPUS DER KÜNSTE

Feature, 02.09.2014

MARC CAMILLE CHAIMOWICZ – FORTY AND FORTY
Galerie NEU
18.09. – 01.11.2014

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Since the 1960’s and 70’s, Marc Camille Chaimowicz has been well known for his extensive installations, which operate in the space between performance and installation, and challenge the borders between art and life. At Galerie NEU’s gallery space at Linienstrasse in Berlin-Mitte, the artist has developed an extensive installation where 40 specially designed and produced vases will be combined with 40 canary birds. Paintings, drawings and sculpture will also be on view, together with works by Manfred Pernice and Klara Lidén, who have also been invited to participate in the exhibition.

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Photos: Marc Camille Chaimowicz, Forty and Forty, Courtesy the artist and Galerie NEU, Berlin

GALERIE NEU

Feature, 01.09.2014

HOW SOON IS NOW
An exhibition by a group of 12 Berlin-based studios of architects,
designers and engineers at Galerie Judin
13.09. – 15.10.2014

Given today’s range of contemporary social, economic and ecological issues in combination with the acceleration of technological change, we are positioned in an inclusive and complex time. HOW SOON IS NOW revisits themes of the legendary exhibition “This Is Tomorrow” held at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London in 1956, curated by Lawrence Alloway, asking if yesterday’s tomorrow is not today, how soon is now? What values and possibilities can we imagine with a more speculative approach that is unburdened by the constraints of everyday practice? Speculating in antagonistic collaboration HOW SOON IS NOW sets up a programme for the future and presents spatial interventions and manifestos by: Barkow Leibinger, Brandlhuber+, Jesko Fezer, Christoph Gengnagel, Fehling & Gogel , Gonzalez Haase AAS, Konstantin Grcic , J. MAYER H. with Marc Kushner, June-14 | Meyer-Grohbrügge & Chermayeff, Ludwig Leo, Sauerbruch Hutton, and Something Fantastic.

Photo: Something Fantastic

Photo: Something Fantastic

GALERIE JUDIN

Feature, 01.09.2014

ABC ART BERLIN CONTEMPORARY 2014
Station at Gleisdreieck, Berlin
18.09. – 21.09.2014

With its innovative, artist-centred format, abc is consciously focused on artistic practice. Each invited gallery is specifically asked to realise a single position of contemporary art. Around 110 galleries – both young and established, national and international – will present mainly new works and premieres. This year abc will also be reinforced by a packed calendar of performances, artists talks, sound pieces, films and theatre productions across the entire site.

Credits: Christian Jankowski, Photo: Marco Funke | Charlotte Posenenske, Mathieu Mercier, Douglas Coupland; Photos: Stefan Korte

Credits: Christian Jankowski, Photo: Marco Funke | Charlotte Posenenske, Mathieu Mercier, Douglas Coupland; Photos: Stefan Korte

ABC ART BERLIN CONTEMPORARY

Feature, 29.08.2014

2 0 1 4 B E R L I N 1 1 0 9
Jochum Rodgers
12.09. – 18.10.2014

Nine Berlin-based artists and architects have been invited by Jochum Rodgers to present contemporary statements in an autumn group show. Berta Fischer, Barkow Leibinger, Thilo Heinzmann, Thomas Kröger, Angela Mewes, Sven Temper, Clemens Tissi, Tina Roeder and Suse Weber – a group of friends among themselves, their practices are grounded in the fine arts, performance, architecture and sculpture, while their respective work is located between the disciplines. Their tendency towards design stems from different interests: experimentation with materials, boredom with the norm, questions of compositions or the joy of provocation. All works in the exhibition are either unique items or editions.

Credits: Clemens Tissi, STUHL STUHL 2, Photo: Thomas Heimann | Suse Weber, Garderobe?für?eine?Marionette, 2013 | Thilo Heinzmann

Credits: Clemens Tissi, STUHL STUHL 2, Photo: Thomas Heimann | Suse Weber, Garderobe für eine Marionette, 2013 | Thilo Heinzmann

JOCHUM RODGERS

Feature, 26.08.2014

NUMBER NINE: ELIZABETH PRICE
Julia Stoschek Collection
05.09.2014 – 01.02.2015

Credits: Elizabeth Price, Sunlight, 2013, film still, Courtesy of the artist and MOT International

Credits: Elizabeth Price, Sunlight, 2013, film still, Courtesy of the artist and MOT International

Since 2006, Elizabeth Price has mainly worked with digital moving images, using possibilities of HD-video recordings with live elements, graphic animations, 3D computer animation, text and sound. The main focus, therefore, of her conceptual, institution-critical works has been to examine the significance of cultural artifacts, collections and archives. Each work initially arises from an idea of a place and its history. Price then explores the broadcast variety of sources of material in an analytical approach to the location, and devises alternative narratives in which humans are not the actors. Instead, objects take the place of social occurrences, institutional contexts and collective desires. In this process-based practice, categorizations and referential systems shed their original meaning, develop a life of their own, and expand in time and space through the rearrangement by narration in video. The scenography of the exhibition at the Julia Stoschek Collection corresponds to the videos in that it unfolds in a special rhythmic sequence that includes the interiors and spatial elements of the installation.

JULIA STOSCHEK COLLECTION