Project, 12.03.2019

I AS HUMAN – Miriam Cahn at Kunsthalle Bern
Feb 22–June 16, 2019

MiriamCahn_Web
meredith grey (gestern im TV gesehen), 15.7.16, 2015, Photo: Markus Tretter, © Miriam Cahn, Courtesy the artist, Meyer Rieger, Berlin/Karlsruheand Galerie Jocelyn Wolff, Paris | liebenmüssen, 30.05.2017, 2017, Photo: Stefan Jeske, © Miriam Cahn

 

Transgressing the boundaries of a classical museum retrospective, Miriam Cahn embodies her presence through a personal staging of a non-linear chronology. The exhibition is assembled following Cahn’s own principles of thought. Emerging from performative happenings of the 70s, her work is heavily influenced by the feminist movement of the 1960s. Yet her approach is radically subtler – disturbing, oneiric paintings sparkling with color, showing figures with crude features and grotesquely exaggerated sexual organs.

Feature, 06.03.2019

FUSING THE BODY AND ENVIRONMENT – FATMA SHANAN AT DITTRICH & SCHLECHTRIEM
MARCH 1–APRIL 13, 2019

Fatma_VS3
A selection of Fatma Shana’s work on display at DITTRICH & SCHLECHTRIEM. Untitled, 2014 | Portrait and scarf, 2013 | Floating Portrait, 2018-2019. All images courtesy of the artist and DITTRICH & SCHLECHTRIEM, Berlin

Her youthful arms remained folded over the hips, as if reinstating the grounding weight of the resting figure. This seemingly allegorical scene is ruptured by Israeli artist Fatma Shana’s choice of motive, now on show at Dittrich & Schlechtriem gallery. Female figures inhabit these large-scale canvases, which not only translate the artist’s poetically-inclined narratives but serve as vessels through which she positions complex relationships between bodies and spaces. Another recurring motive are the rugs, both as a reference to her roots within the minority Druze culture in Israel where she was raised, but also more importantly in their function as territories within the picture and mediators between bodies and architecture.

Project, 07.02.2019

THE YOUNG PICASSO – BLUE AND ROSE PERIODS AT FONDATION BEYELER
FEB 03– MAY 26, 2019

picasso
A selection of Pablo Picassos pieces of the rose and blue period. Femme en chemise (Madeleine), 1904-1905 © Succession Picasso / 2018, ProLitteris, Zurich, Photo: Tate, London 2018 | Acrobate et jeune arlequin, 1905 © Succession Picasso / ProLitteris, Zurich 2018 | Famille de Saltimbanques aver un singe, 1905 © Succession Picasso /2018, ProLitteris, Zurich

It’s easy to think of Pablo Picasso as almighty: a painter who changed the course of art history, who unabashedly made art in his boxers, and who responded to questions from critics by firing a gun into the air. But the young Picasso wasn’t always so confident or successful. In fact, his early years were fraught with poverty, tragedy, and emotional frailty—and it was these struggles that he channelled into his first pioneering body of work, known as the Blue Period. One of the first paintings he produced, The Death of Casagemas (1901), responded directly to a suicide of a close friend. But from one artistic revolution followed another, in a rapid succession of changing styles and visual worlds.  Indeed, only a few years after finishing The Death of Casagemas, Picasso moved to Paris and emerged from his Blue Period—into a palette of soft, joyful pinks. “Colors, like features, follow the changes of the emotions,” Picasso later explained. He also met Fernande Olivier that year, a French artist and model who was to become both his muse and mistress. Different facets from this new environment were brought to light on his canvases; friends from the Parisian literary scene, along his  fascination with the fairground and circus performers. Many of his works from these years led up to his use of Cubism. As diverse as they seem, the two periods are connected by significants strands of thought, conveyed in this most comprehensive presentation of Picasso’s paintings and sculptures from 1901 to 1906. 

Project, 14.12.2018

Marmor für Alle – a city guide to works of public art throughout Berlin

Marmor_web_Vs2
Richard Serra, Berlin Junction, 1987 / Otto Herbert Hajek, Stadtzeichen/Gruppe von drei ” Raumzeichen”, 1972–1974 / Ulrich Brüschke, 0° Breite, 2012 | Photo: Mathias Rümmler

Hidden and eye-catching, obsolete and modern, unremarkable and prominent, the sight of public art in Berlin is ubiquitous, and its reception divisive. From larger then life sculptures to subtle textual interventions in unusual urban contexts, “Marmor für Alle” sets the encounter with some of the most important and public art across the city. After 1945, a boom began in the East and West Berlin, punctuating numerous places of assembly with some of the most iconic and cult fixtures: “Hand with Watch” by German artist Joachim Schmettau that featured in Depeche Mode music video, “Denkzeichen Rosa Luxemburg” by the infamous conceptual artist Hans Haacke, or the towering “Molecule Man” by Jonathan Borowsky rising from the Spree. Zooming in on different districts, each section of the book reveals and vivifies elements of the city’s biography through works of public art – evidencing the historical events and political ideas that shaped them.

Feature, 06.12.2018

Frizz23 – a building cooperative for education creative business and temporary living in Berlin

Frizz_web_vs1
© Photo: Jan Bitter, Sketch: Deadline Architekten

The completion of Frizz23 in Kreuzberg marks a milestone and a stroke of good fortune in Berlins real estate politics. This cooperative building demonstrates the possibilities of bottom-up urban development how it can be constructive and successful when the lead is taken by citizens and local actors.

Frizz23 combinenon-profit education, small creative businesses and temporary residences under a single cooperative building venture. In a tireless process of interchange with local actors, the district authorities and the Berlin Senate, the initiators FORUM Berufsbildung and Deadline Architects along with the building groups forty-two members have created a diverse structure, that is more than just another private facility for investor-owners fromthe creative class: The education offered here is accessible to everyone, including low-income segments of society. Frizz23 is an attempt to counteract the impending gentrification of this area and project an image of another Berlin.

Project, 30.11.2018

The Art of Museums, an eight-part documentary series

TAOM_web_vs1
A studio visit of Julie Mehretu, Vivienne Westwood at the Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien and a manifesto by Jonathan Meese |© Konrad Waldmann, Gebrüder Beetz Filmproduktion, Jonathan Meese

Museums are more then guardians of our material culture and narrators of alternative histories – they are witnesses to eras of dramatic battles and great triumphs, and moments of hope and happiness, which are inscribed in the biography of the buildings. Each of the eight-part documentary series The Art of Museums takes the audience on a visit to one of the world-class museums, accompanied by the art historian Dr. Matt Lodder, a lecturer at the University of Essex. The films also give viewers a look behind the otherwise closed doors of restoration workshops and depot rooms. In the Prado, curators unveil the largest Goya collection in the world. At the Musée d’Orsay, we take a look at the colour layers of Impressionist masterpieces with restorers, or enter a secret room in the high-security wing of the Oslo Munch Museum, which houses “The Scream,” one of the world’s most expensive paintings. Every visit unfolds as a personal encounter between one of the masterworks and a renowned artist and designer such as Jonathan Meese, Marina Abramovic, Norman Foster, Ólafur Elíasson, Vivianne Westwood and Wolfgang Joop, who each inject their own idiosyncratic outlook into the mediation of works.

Project, 29.11.2018

Friedrich von Borries addresses the political moment in design
Nov 30, 2018 – Sept 29, 2019

FVB_web_vs4
The manifesto by Friedrich von Borries, an installation view from the exhibition at Neue Sammlung The Design Museum and Die Münchner Rutsche, Berlin 2018 | © Projektbüro Friedrich von Borries, graphic manifesto: Ingo Offermanns, photo Die Münchner Rutsche: Achim Hatzius

The last decade has seen catastrophic shifts in global politics, economy and the environment. Foregrounding the role of contemporary positions in design, architect and design theorist Friedrich von Borries raises the question around socially and politically responsible practices. Engaging with his earlier literary work that proposed new methods for social criticism through art and design, the exhibition reframes Borries’ pragmatic approach through a series of interventions in the museum space. “Politics of Design” is the first of the three parts that conceptually underpin the exhibition and addresses the political moment in design. It uses the theses ”design sexualizes”, “design colonizes” and “design manipulates” as entryways to open up new perspective on Coca-Cola advertising, the Sony Walkman and modernist furniture. The second part of the exhibition takes a personal reading of the Friedrich von Borries’ work through a Sisyphean marble-run installation by the artist Mikael Mikael that points at the absurdist dimension of a politically active artist and designer. The third part “Design as Politics” explores the possibilities for shaping the political environment through design. Coexisting as a carrier of messages and a tool of influence design is used to persuade. The question we have a responsibility to ask is, “Persuade to do what and to whose benefit?”

Project, 22.11.2018

The story of Grill Royal

Web_GrillRoyal_VS1
Impressions of the Grill Royal photographed by Stefan Korte, Robert Rieger, Maxime Ballesteros and Peter Langer

It is customary to describe Grill Royal as an institution – more than a luxe restaurant boasting one of Berlins most extensive steak menus, it is an open and dynamic meeting place, exuding an offbeat sense of intimacy. The vision of owners Boris Radczun and Stephan Landwehr was seemingly straightforward; a restaurant where one could dine exquisitely, in good company, stumbling on an unlikely location in the basement of a former East German building. On gastronomic terms, Grill Royal, run together with Moritz Estermann, draws stimuli from the classic grill restaurants found in grand hotels, but to anyone who has spent an evening there, it becomes abundantly clear that it resists any easy classification. The story of Grill Royal is reflected in the book GRILL ROYAL, accompanied with the photo reportage A Day by Peter Langer, portraying previously unreleased impressions of the hustle and bustle behind the scenes of the restaurant, while Maxime Ballesteros captures the unique atmosphere at night in A Night. Further images are included by Stefan Korte, Florian Bolk and Robert Rieger. The texts on hospitality and meat come from Adriano Sack, Erwin Seitz, René Pollesch and Prof. Thomas Vilgis. In addition, Stuart Pigott talks to Andrea Kauk and Moritz Estermann about the wine selection.

Project, 23.10.2018

Under the title “WORK” Vitra addresses the increased merging of office and public space
Oct 23–27, 2018 AT ORGATEC

When designer duo Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby observe that “the rules of formal work are dissolving, resulting in the archetype of classic desk disappearing”, they underline a growing transformation of work environment, setting the scene for Vitra’s latest presentation at Orgatec trade fair. Under the tile “WORK” Vitra addresses the increased merging of office and public space, highlighting three exemplary office concepts which make propositions for the changing needs of modern work. Konstantin Grcic’s concept of “Superflexible Office” deals with the possibilities of constantly rebuilding the office while still preserving its identity: open to be reconfigured as a meeting room, a café or a communal space. With “Company Home”, the architect Sevil Peach has developed a different scenario which also includes a park and a dining area – elements of public space that are becoming an integral part of architecture in more corporate headquarters. “Shared Office” blurs the boundaries between the office and the public space, as we become more familiarised with working in environments such as co-working spaces, cafés and hotel lobbies. As part of this concept “Soft Work” is a new modular sofa system by Vitra that responds to these conditions, developed in collaboration with designers Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby.

Feature, 17.10.2018

The Power of the Arts 2018

POTA_webFoto: Robert Rieger

As borders are thrown up around the world, limiting movement and emphasising individual sovereignty, it is again time to reexamine the role of culture in promoting a more open society. What are the forces of change that socially engaged initiatives should advocate against the current divisive climate? The four awarded projects selected from this year’s open call of the “The Power of the Arts” initiative, will be able to test, examine and realise some of the ideas behind different modes of multi-disciplinary collaboration, intergenerational knowledge production and self-organised cooperation. The independent jury appointed by the initiator and sponsor of The Power of the Arts, Philip Morris GmbH, has been looking for progressive non-profit institutions and initiatives in Germany, that seek to open up art as an integrative tool for connecting people, irrespective of their social situation, education level, a disability, or origin. The jury has awarded these outstanding projects: Kulturisten2 (Stiftung Generation-Zusammenhalt), Migrantpolitan (Kampnagel), Musik für einen Stadtteil  District Cantorate Mümmelmannsberg & Trimum e.V. and Weiter Schreiben, wearedoingit e.V.