Feature, 06.12.2018

Frizz23 – a building cooperative for education creative business and temporary living in Berlin

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© Photo: Jan Bitter, Sketch: Deadline Architekten

The completion of Frizz23 in Kreuzberg marks a milestone and a stroke of good fortune in Berlins real estate politics. This cooperative building demonstrates the possibilities of bottom-up urban development how it can be constructive and successful when the lead is taken by citizens and local actors.

Frizz23 combinenon-profit education, small creative businesses and temporary residences under a single cooperative building venture. In a tireless process of interchange with local actors, the district authorities and the Berlin Senate, the initiators FORUM Berufsbildung and Deadline Architects along with the building groups forty-two members have created a diverse structure, that is more than just another private facility for investor-owners fromthe creative class: The education offered here is accessible to everyone, including low-income segments of society. Frizz23 is an attempt to counteract the impending gentrification of this area and project an image of another Berlin.

Project, 30.11.2018

The Art of Museums, an eight-part documentary series

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A studio visit of Julie Mehretu, Vivienne Westwood at the Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien and a manifesto by Jonathan Meese |© Konrad Waldmann, Gebrüder Beetz Filmproduktion, Jonathan Meese

Museums are more then guardians of our material culture and narrators of alternative histories – they are witnesses to eras of dramatic battles and great triumphs, and moments of hope and happiness, which are inscribed in the biography of the buildings. Each of the eight-part documentary series The Art of Museums takes the audience on a visit to one of the world-class museums, accompanied by the art historian Dr. Matt Lodder, a lecturer at the University of Essex. The films also give viewers a look behind the otherwise closed doors of restoration workshops and depot rooms. In the Prado, curators unveil the largest Goya collection in the world. At the Musée d’Orsay, we take a look at the colour layers of Impressionist masterpieces with restorers, or enter a secret room in the high-security wing of the Oslo Munch Museum, which houses “The Scream,” one of the world’s most expensive paintings. Every visit unfolds as a personal encounter between one of the masterworks and a renowned artist and designer such as Jonathan Meese, Marina Abramovic, Norman Foster, Ólafur Elíasson, Vivianne Westwood and Wolfgang Joop, who each inject their own idiosyncratic outlook into the mediation of works.

Project, 29.11.2018

Friedrich von Borries addresses the political moment in design
Nov 30, 2018 – Sept 29, 2019

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The manifesto by Friedrich von Borries, an installation view from the exhibition at Neue Sammlung The Design Museum and Die Münchner Rutsche, Berlin 2018 | © Projektbüro Friedrich von Borries, graphic manifesto: Ingo Offermanns, photo Die Münchner Rutsche: Achim Hatzius

The last decade has seen catastrophic shifts in global politics, economy and the environment. Foregrounding the role of contemporary positions in design, architect and design theorist Friedrich von Borries raises the question around socially and politically responsible practices. Engaging with his earlier literary work that proposed new methods for social criticism through art and design, the exhibition reframes Borries’ pragmatic approach through a series of interventions in the museum space. “Politics of Design” is the first of the three parts that conceptually underpin the exhibition and addresses the political moment in design. It uses the theses ”design sexualizes”, “design colonizes” and “design manipulates” as entryways to open up new perspective on Coca-Cola advertising, the Sony Walkman and modernist furniture. The second part of the exhibition takes a personal reading of the Friedrich von Borries’ work through a Sisyphean marble-run installation by the artist Mikael Mikael that points at the absurdist dimension of a politically active artist and designer. The third part “Design as Politics” explores the possibilities for shaping the political environment through design. Coexisting as a carrier of messages and a tool of influence design is used to persuade. The question we have a responsibility to ask is, “Persuade to do what and to whose benefit?”

Project, 22.11.2018

The story of Grill Royal

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Impressions of the Grill Royal photographed by Stefan Korte, Robert Rieger, Maxime Ballesteros and Peter Langer

It is customary to describe Grill Royal as an institution – more than a luxe restaurant boasting one of Berlins most extensive steak menus, it is an open and dynamic meeting place, exuding an offbeat sense of intimacy. The vision of owners Boris Radczun and Stephan Landwehr was seemingly straightforward; a restaurant where one could dine exquisitely, in good company, stumbling on an unlikely location in the basement of a former East German building. On gastronomic terms, Grill Royal, run together with Moritz Estermann, draws stimuli from the classic grill restaurants found in grand hotels, but to anyone who has spent an evening there, it becomes abundantly clear that it resists any easy classification. The story of Grill Royal is reflected in the book GRILL ROYAL, accompanied with the photo reportage A Day by Peter Langer, portraying previously unreleased impressions of the hustle and bustle behind the scenes of the restaurant, while Maxime Ballesteros captures the unique atmosphere at night in A Night. Further images are included by Stefan Korte, Florian Bolk and Robert Rieger. The texts on hospitality and meat come from Adriano Sack, Erwin Seitz, René Pollesch and Prof. Thomas Vilgis. In addition, Stuart Pigott talks to Andrea Kauk and Moritz Estermann about the wine selection.

Project, 23.10.2018

Under the title “WORK” Vitra addresses the increased merging of office and public space
Oct 23–27, 2018 AT ORGATEC

When designer duo Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby observe that “the rules of formal work are dissolving, resulting in the archetype of classic desk disappearing”, they underline a growing transformation of work environment, setting the scene for Vitra’s latest presentation at Orgatec trade fair. Under the tile “WORK” Vitra addresses the increased merging of office and public space, highlighting three exemplary office concepts which make propositions for the changing needs of modern work. Konstantin Grcic’s concept of “Superflexible Office” deals with the possibilities of constantly rebuilding the office while still preserving its identity: open to be reconfigured as a meeting room, a café or a communal space. With “Company Home”, the architect Sevil Peach has developed a different scenario which also includes a park and a dining area – elements of public space that are becoming an integral part of architecture in more corporate headquarters. “Shared Office” blurs the boundaries between the office and the public space, as we become more familiarised with working in environments such as co-working spaces, cafés and hotel lobbies. As part of this concept “Soft Work” is a new modular sofa system by Vitra that responds to these conditions, developed in collaboration with designers Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby.

Feature, 17.10.2018

The Power of the Arts 2018

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As borders are thrown up around the world, limiting movement and emphasising individual sovereignty, it is again time to reexamine the role of culture in promoting a more open society. What are the forces of change that socially engaged initiatives should advocate against the current divisive climate? The four awarded projects selected from this year’s open call of the “The Power of the Arts” initiative, will be able to test, examine and realise some of the ideas behind different modes of multi-disciplinary collaboration, intergenerational knowledge production and self-organised cooperation. The independent jury appointed by the initiator and sponsor of The Power of the Arts, Philip Morris GmbH, has been looking for progressive non-profit institutions and initiatives in Germany, that seek to open up art as an integrative tool for connecting people, irrespective of their social situation, education level, a disability, or origin. The jury has awarded these outstanding projects: Kulturisten2 (Stiftung Generation-Zusammenhalt), Migrantpolitan (Kampnagel), Musik für einen Stadtteil  District Cantorate Mümmelmannsberg & Trimum e.V. and Weiter Schreiben, wearedoingit e.V.

Project, 29.09.2018

Victor Papanek: The Politics of Design
Sept 29, 2018–March 03, 2019

What is social design and is there such a thing anyway? The term is typically used to label the work of those designers and architects who focus on tasks born out of humanitarian and socio-political issues, and it has often gone hand in hand with moralism and sweeping declarations. In a world growing deficient in both resources and energy, questions regarding inclusion, social justice, and sustainability are becoming more relevant to today’s design than ever before. In the 1960s and 70s Viktor Papanek was among the first to address not only issues of living conditions, class and income difference, but also environmental responsibility. Many designers practicing today carry in their pocket his “little green book” Design for the Real World (1971), which remains the most widely read book about design ever published. The exhibition at the Vitra Design Museum dedicated to the life and work of this prolific author, designer and lecturer is set to re-examine methods, usage and applications of Papanek’s approach to design as a political tool. Both a retrospective and a thematic exhibition, it gathers his manifold drawings, objects, films, manuscripts, and prints, some of which have never before been presented. Drawing upon his inter-disciplinary and collaborative methods, the exhibition forges dialogues between contemporary works from the areas of critical and social design, and radical positions from the 1960s to 1980s, including legendary figures such as George Nelson, Richard Buckminster Fuller, Marshall McLuhan, or the radical design initiative ‘Global Tools’. Contemporary works from the areas of critical and social design provide insight into Papanek’s lasting impact.Web_Papanek

Victor J. Papanek, We are all handicapped (drafted with students in 1969). Section from Big Character Poster No. 1: Work Chart for Designers (1973). | Victor J. Papanek, Tin Can Radio, 1971. | Victor J. Papanek filming the WNED-TV Channel 17 programme Design Dimensions in Buffalo, NY (1961 – 1963). | Victor J. Papanek, The minimal design team (drafted with students in 1969). Section from Big Character Poster No. 1: Work Chart for Designers (1973). | © University of Applied Arts Vienna, Victor J. Papanek Foundation

 

Project, 28.09.2018

art berlin takes place in two hangars of the historical Tempelhof Airport
Sept 27–30, 2018

As a vital instrument for promoting the work of both younger artists and established figures, the main section of the fair will present a comprehensive overview of contemporary positions, with six Brazilian galleries joining together to present contemporary Latin American art, while four Austrian galleries will focus on sculpture. Continuing on the fair’s commitment to experimenting with the modes of display and overturning the expectations of a commercial fair, art berlin will also offer a blizzard of other strands. Galleries such as Sprüth Magers, Galerie Neu and neugerriemschneider are highlighting solo presentations and curated projects, maintaining the fair’s original commitment to a more comprehensive overview of individual artistic practices. Inaugurating the fair’s new Salon format, a large-scale group exhibition curated by Paris-based curator Tenzing Barshee, will bring together works from more then 40 galleries in a customized spatial configuration, designed by the upcoming London-based architect Alessandro Bava. In the close proximity to the main building and as part of the surrounding outdoor park, art berlin will present a number of new sculptures.

Project, 21.09.2018

Julian Charrière
An Invitation to Disappear

Julian Charrière - An Invitation to Disappear - Tenggarong, 2018 (copyright the artist; VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany)
Julian Charrière, An Invitation to Disappear – Tenggarong  © The artist; VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

“The bright sun was extinguished, morning came and went and came, and brought no day,” noted the Romantic poet Lord Byron in his diary, amidst the general atmosphere of mysterious darkness and cataclysmic desolation that hit the world in 1815. The year when the warm-bright and flaming red pyroclastic flows of hot volcanic debris rolled down the volcano atop the paradise landscape of Indonesian island of Sobwoa, catalyzing one of the world’s biggest natural climate crises. The volcano’s name Tambora, which translates as “an invitation to disappear” ominously signified the dystopian scenario that in its monumental and global impact on landscape, reconciled the sublime beauty and pervasive atrocity. The ensuing “year without summer” aggregated global floods and famines but it also produced unexpected beauty that rose from the ruinous decay. The sunsets changed due to the countless aerosols in the atmosphere, diversifying the spectrum of colours, that would later resurface in the luminous surfaces of J.M.W. Turner and Caspar David Friedrich during this period. Some 200 years later the invitation to disappear confronts the contemporary hyper-industrialized society with anthropogenic dimensions, leaving strange new synthetic forms in the environment that loom with a premonition of “a year without winter.” Through a trans-disciplinary and multifaceted field of research that inventively links geology, biology, physics, history and archaeology, the artist Julian Charrière delves into post-romantic constructions of nature, where deep geological timescales are brought into tension with those of the mankind. Hosted at Berghain, his audio visual performance Invitation to Disappear projects adistant burning image of a synthetic jungle, emerging through a mullti-sensory journey between flickering light and spectral techno, soundtracked by Inland. Julian Charrière will also present a new spatial installation As We Used to Float at Berlinische Galerie.

Project, 21.09.2018

BNKR | SPACE IS THE PLACE (1/4):
Thresholds. Limits of Space
Sept 13–Dec 9, 2018

Web_BNKRAndrea Fraser, Little Frank and His Carp, 2001 © The artist, Galerie Nagel Draxler | Jeewi Lee, Einschlag © The artist | Raul Watch, Eureka, 2015 © The artist | Wermke / Leinkauf, Überwindungsübungen, 2015 © Wermke / Leinkauf
The exhibition cycle SPACE IS THE PLACE starts with the group exhibition Thresholds. Limits of Space. Based on Bruce Nauman’s seminal work Body Pressure (1974) which provides a set of typed out instructions for merging their bodies with an architectural surface, the exhibition explores the corporal-spatial unit of critically experiencing space through the works of different generations of artists. In her ingenious single channel video performance entitled Little Frank and His Carp (2001), the American artist Andrea Fraser is for example seen walking around the atrium of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao listening to the institution’s official audio guide, which culminates in an equally ironic and erotic encounter between the artist and the architecture. Wermke/Leinkauf investigate the surmounting of architectures in Berlin’s former border area in a 6-channel slide projection. Here, archive images from 1974/75 depicting East German border troops simulating an escape at a so called “Lehrgrenze“ (“training border“) serve as source material for the German artist duo. The work reflects upon the former border situation and deals in a playful way with history, freedom and memory. With new in-situ works Jeewi Lee and Raul Walch also dedicate themselves to artistic conquest of spatial borderlines in interior and exterior spaces. Jeewi Lee’s Einschlag (“Impact”) ingeniously inverts the actual purpose of a wrecking ball as an instrument to bring down walls and demolish buildings. Hanging from the ceiling of the former bomb shelter, the wrecking ball appears as if after an act of destruction. Obvious traces of deformation caused by the inner walls of the exhibition space show on the wrecking ball and not as originally preconceived. Here, the wrecking ball itself becomes a metaphorical depiction of the brutal history of the WWII bunker. Raul Walch takes the discourse into the urban realm with a series of work entitled Eureka. In Berlin and Munich, Walch transforms city hydrants in the surrounding urban environment into ephemeral fountains.