Feature, 24.04.2017

Experiments at Jochum Rodgers
Apr 26 – Jun 3, 2017

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From a period of political upheaval and rebellion against existing societal structures, a diverse set of stylistic trends emerged in the 60s and 70s. For the exhibition ‘Experiments’ Jochum Rodgers combines unusual design objects of the two decades in question selected by numerous architects, designers and artists. As the title implies, what acted as a driving force for the creation of the objects was not merely functional necessity but the actual pleasure derived from experimentation. Among the iconic exhibits, there are pieces by Joe Colombo, Pietro Cascella, Gianfranco Fini, Pier Giacomo & Achille Castiglioni, Frank O. Gehry, Piero Gilardi, Hans Gugelot, Gruppo Archizoom, Gruppo A.R.D.I.T.I., Ennio Lucini, Hans von Klier, Angelo Mangiarotti, Gino Marotta, Casati Ponzio, Gino Sarfatti, Ettore Sottsass, Studio Tetrarch and Superstudio.

 

top picture: TOVAGLIA coffee table (Studio Tetrarch) bottom pictures: Prismar lamp (A.R.D.I.T.I.) / Rampa , design by Pier Giacomo & Achille Castiglione, 1963 / „You’ll come back“ chair by Ceretti, Derossi, Rosso, Torneraj 1969

top picture: TOVAGLIA coffee table (Studio Tetrarch), 1969
bottom pictures: Prismar lamp (A.R.D.I.T.I.) / Rampa , design by Pier Giacomo & Achille Castiglione, 1963 / „You’ll come back“ chair by Ceretti, Derossi, Rosso, Torneraj 1969

Project, 13.04.2017

Swiss Grand Award for Design 2017
Recognising the movers and shakers of the creative landscape in Switzerland

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Since 2007, in addition to the Swiss Design Awards, the Federal Office of Culture has presented the Swiss Grand Award for Design to individual designers or established firms that contribute to the renown of Swiss design nationally and internationally. Having originated as a means of encouraging, supporting and ultimately honouring the Swiss design scene, the prize communicates and indicates the traditions of Swiss design. This year the disciplines of the three laureates range from graphic design to jewellery and illustration; all of which have played a key role in the cultural fabric of Switzerland. David Bielander translates simple, everyday objects into items straddling the line between jewellery and artwork. His contemporary pieces open up unexpected lines of communication and discreetly narrate underlying stories for both the wearer and the perceiver. Another mode of storytelling is found in the work of Thomas Ott whose dark, meticulous comics don’t contain words yet manage to be universally comprehensible. As Ott’s work becomes more layered and complex, it gives rise to kaleidoscopic narratives and painstaking detail. This marked the first time that the award goes to a comic artist. Similarly following a precise optical language and consistent set of tools, Jean Widmer, one of the first Swiss graphic designers in Paris, produces clear designs ahead of their time. Among others, he’s created the visual identity for such institutions as Musée?d’Orsay and Centre Georges Pompidou – where his emblematic logo still remains.

Feature, 12.04.2017

The Anti-Museum
An anthology devoted to a radical artistic engagement

book cover and Marcel Broodthaers with camel in front of Palais des Beaux-Arts de Bruxelles © Maria Gilissen

book cover and Marcel Broodthaers with camel in front of Palais des Beaux-Arts de Bruxelles © Maria Gilissen

“Museums should be invisible. With an imaginary museum you can do whatever you want.” –
Maurizio Cattelan

What does the term anti-art encompass? It’s shaped by an array of concepts that reject prior definitions of art and question the art system and how it functions. “The Anti-Museum“, an extensive anthology by Mathieu Copeland and Balthazar Lovay, addresses the idea of anti-art through numerous contributions by renowned artists and writers. From interviews and historical reprints to manifestos and commissioned essays, the 794-page encyclopaedic tome presents the first comprehensive exploration of the radical and paradoxical concept that is the ‘anti-museum’ – a term so present in art history and yet one that has never been the object of detailed investigation. The museum has always been a target for criticism, whether it comes from artists, thinkers, curators, or even the public. Dedicated to all forms of “anti” such as Anti-Art, Anti-Technology, Anti-Design and Anti-Philosophy, the publication features numerous texts from the 60s until today – including newly commissioned as well as never-before-translated pieces – to define the idea of anti-art in a broad sense, evoking attempts to disrupt rules and customs in artistic disciplines.

Review, 11.04.2017

BUREAU N went south
for documenta 14

After leaving its home in Kassel for a few months, documenta has moved to Athens for the first part of its 14th iteration, and we were there to experience its multifarious program sprawling across museums, cinemas, residential spaces, pavements and even radio stations and kiosks, to name a few of the locations. Four years in the making, under the working title “Learning from Athens”, one of the topics addressed in documenta 14 is the meaning of education and its reconstitution through the works of more than 160 international artists. Following the press conference opening featuring a cacophony of all participating artists and members of the team onstage, the artistic director Adam Szymczyk encapsulated this year’s approach: “Unlearning what we believe we know is the beginning. There are no masters that can tell us how to live or what to do. We are in need to mobilize energies and act through unlearning. As we abandon preconceptions, and some of our hopes too, we immerse in the darkness of now knowing. And only from that state can we then make small steps towards something different.” More than a couple of times we were urged to “get lost” in the city, fully experience the public realm and embrace the peripatetic manners of ancient Greek philosophers. Among numerous spaces and places, the program took us from the impressive building of the Athens Conservatoire built in the ‘50s as a vision of central European rationalism, to the former brewery housing the National Contemporary Art Museum, to the Polytechnion – an emblem of historical resistance, to a pavement inscribed with Samuel Beckett’s poetry, and a kiosk turned into an electronic music station on a picturesque plateia. Sound has indeed a prominent role in the program and is an essential part of its impact. Sonic elements are dispersed throughout, whether as protagonists or as discreet additions permeating the visual spectrum; appearing announced or other times fully conquering your headspace. It often felt like this year’s documenta should be heard more than seen.

As April 9th marked the first day of the 1,850-mile journey on horseback to Kassel starting from the side of the Acropolis, we also anticipate the second part of documenta and the evolution of this ‘continuum’.

 

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Project, 04.04.2017

Design Display #4: Between MXN and the US
Two projects consider socio-political questions
Mar 30 – Jul 30, 2017

Carla-Fernandez © Inka & Niclas / Border-City © FR-EE

Vestido Cobra. Photo: Edgar Aguirre © Carla Fernández / Border-City © FR-EE

 

With the aim to stimulate discussion on the social dimensions of design, the 4th edition of the Design Display series at Autostadt Wolfsburg (Konzernforum) takes Mexico as its main point of departure. Inside the exhibition’s characteristic 20-metre-long glass display, an intercultural bridge between Mexico and the US is figuratively built through two contemporary designer projects. On the one side is Vestido Cobra, a dress created by Mexican fashion designer Carla Fernández who explores how fashion can uphold traditions and still point the way to the future. By bringing Mexican styles and manufacturing techniques into contemporary fashion, she draws attention to the cultural heritage of her homeland within a modern context. The unisex “snake dress” questions gender roles and embraces craftsmanship. On the other side of the glass display is a multimedia installation dealing with the US-Mexican border by architect Fernando Romero. Conceived as an ideal metropolis with multiple urban centres, Romero’s Border City is a bi-national future city designed to straddle the controversial border, serving as a model for new cities around the world. Romero’s visionary project explores the potential to create organized growth and multiple urban centres in sprawling regions lacking infrastructure.
The exhibition’s accompanying magazine On Display continues the discussion through features on the work of the two participating designers, a detailed piece about the border area between Mexico and the United States, and an essay on the influence of traditional craftsmanship on modern Mexican design.

Feature, 28.03.2017

The Power of the Arts – Open Call
Fostering social equality through arts and culture

 

Anton Unai for The Power of the Arts © Philip Morris GmbH

Anton Unai for The Power of the Arts © Philip Morris GmbH

As an active response to the social challenges of our times, a new creative initiative advocates for the seamless integration and inclusion of people with a refugee and migration background in Germany through the arts, music, theater, and dance. One in five people in Germany have a migratory history, two-thirds of which belong to the first generation. We don’t always celebrate the same festivities. We don’t always speak the same language. We don’t always believe in the same deity. But it’s undeniable that the world of the arts can act as an equalizing and unifying resource, and that’s the direction we should be moving towards to. With The Power of the Arts initiative, launched by the Philip Morris GmbH, each year an independent jury selects four winning projects, awarded with 50,000 euros each, put forward by non-profit institutions and creative artists. All participants use numerous artistic disciplines to endorse social and cultural equality as well as deeper understanding among individuals. What serves as the main purpose of the initiative is to encourage an open, interculturally shaped society that leaves no room for discrimination and marginalization. Creativity and people’s abilities are invested in coexistence and collaborative progress.
Project submissions and information on the call for applications from 27 March until 9 June 2017.

Feature, 17.03.2017

As you said
Paul Elliman at KW
Mar 18 – May 14, 2017

Paul Elliman Autumn/Winter 2016/17, (2017) Poster campagne, Courtesy the artist

Paul Elliman, Autumn/Winter 2016/17, (2017) Poster campaign, Courtesy the artist

British artist Paul Elliman has consistently engaged with the production and performance of language as a material component of the socially constructed environment. In a world where objects and people are equally subject to the force fields of mass production, Elliman explores the range of human expression as a kind of typography. His exhibition As you said includes various works, both existing and new, that test the boundaries of our communication through letter-like objects, language- like vocal sounds, actions, shapes, silences, and movements of the body. Whether concealed by clothing or techniques of mimicry, our gestures and the desire for language are always within easy reach of the violently communicative raw material of the city. As you said is structured around a set of vitrines devised by the artist Ian Wilson —which Elliman considers as sculptures, objects of display, and sites for discourse—and a pair of billboards. Elliman employs the vitrines as a framing device for a selection of his work from over the last 25 years, while the billboards extend the exhibition out into the streets of Berlin.

Feature, 07.03.2017

Where Lemongrass meets Kohlrabi
Contemporary Thai Cuisine in Berlin

Photos: Robert Rieger

Photos: Robert Rieger

The Grill Royal family has teamed up with artist Rirkrit Tiravanija and chef Dalad Kambhu for their latest restaurant, Kin Dee. Here, contemporary Thai cuisine is served family style – dishes such as whole fried fish or beef stew are plated to share among several people. Lemongrass, kaffir lime, wild ginger, galangal, curcuma, coriander or red chili are essential ingredients. However, whenever possible, the chef and her international team substitute imported products with regional ones from her network of local suppliers. This leads to a modern interpretation of Thai food without sacrificing flavor: sweet apple in place of mango, yellow turnip in place of Asian sweet potato, or pickled kohlrabi in place of papaya. Located in Schöneberg, Kin Dee inherits the former space of the restaurant Edd’s. Out of respect for its history, only small changes and refurbishments have been made to the space. One new addition, though, is the artwork that hangs in the dining room: some of these pieces were created by co-owner Tiravanija, and other were made by artist friends.

Feature, 07.03.2017

‘So an Elephant Walks into a Bar…’:
Frankfurt’s New Concept Bar Bonechina

Placed on a high pedestal at the heart of Frankfurt Alt-Sachsenhausen’s new bar Bonechina is a night-blue, porcelain elephant. Coincidentally, it is also your bartender: tonic water splashes from its mouth. Guests are invited to mix their own drinks, gathering around the sculpture to fill their cups, choose between a sandalwood or Vetiver aromatic ice cube, possibly exchange some names and stories. Developed by the Lindenberg Group, Bonechina is less of a bar than what a bar may dream of. Absent are the bartenders (though two hosts are present to prepare drinks if desired), and gone are the counter, the stools. With a visual concept designed by Studio Aberja, the whole interior glimmers across ceramic tiles called Frankfurter Fliese, diamond-cut and painted in the same shade of blue as the elephant-fountain. The blue continues onto the curtains and upholstery, and above the light limbs of pear-wood furniture, aromatic diffusers let out puffs of yuzu and bergamot throughout the evening. With all of this housed inside a baroque building from the wooden-shingled 18th century, the 20 lucky guests for a night at Bonechina may start to think they’re dreaming too.

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Photos: Steve Herud

Photos: Steve Herud

Project, 02.03.2017

Transformation of Berinson´s exhibition space
by Gonzalez Haase AAS

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Galerie Berinson newly housed in an apartment of a historic Gründerzeit building in Charlottenburg. Gonzalez Haase AAS, which designed the interior of the former gallery in Kreuzberg, has travelled west with them. With its parquet floors, stucco-work molding around the ceilings, and a pre-modern floorplan, the new venue is a radically different space than Berinson’s open loft-format from before. To contrast the old-fashioned feel, the architects have remodeled the space with a sense of rigor, simplicity, and clarity. All the built-in walls that weren’t a part of the building’s load-bearing structure were removed, creating an even circulation through the gallery. At the head of its main hallway is an office space with an exposed storage area; along the hall’s other side are entrances to the three exhibition spaces. In line with the architectural concept, the original connections between these exhibition rooms – double doors in the middle of the walls – have been closed up and replaced by neutral openings. Finally, a system of cool lighting from bold, metallic track fixtures is installed in strict parallel to the main axis of the apartment, two in the hallway and two running through the exhibition rooms. These additions are of a characteristic style for Gonzalez and Haase, and serve to unify Galerie Berinson’s new home: the fixtures become a part of the architecture itself, separating and organizing space through their form, size and design.