Project, 22.05.2017

FARAWAY, SO CLOSE
The 25th Biennial of Design in Ljubljana
May 24 – Oct 29, 2017

Photo: Delfino Sisto Legnani and Marco Cappelletti. Graphic design: Grupa Ee.

Photo: Delfino Sisto Legnani and Marco Cappelletti. Graphic design: Grupa Ee.

 

As a consequence of “post-modernization” at large, the city seems to have lost its authority as the sole territory we look to for the source of quality existence. Contained within the title of the 25th Biennial of Design, FARAWAY, SO CLOSE, are many topics of the ensuing debate: could we re-occupy distant places, activate remote territories, re-enact ancient relations through our urban habits? Can new frictions between distant conditions emerge, and produce new scenarios for a different present time? Slovenia, with its specific geographical condition, will perform as a paradigm to stimulate, discuss and test the status of this global shift. Rather than an exhibition of existing projects, the biennial is conceived as a production platform where groups of designers develop different scenarios as alternatives to established systems. Seven Slovenian individuals, known for their work outside of the design field, were paired with seven international creative figures, chosen for their ability to use design and architecture as tools for investigating contemporary issues – Studio Formafantasma with Andrej Detela; Matali Crasset with Matej Fegus; Point Supreme with Iztok Kovac; Didier Faustino with Mojca Kumerdej; Studio Mischer’Traxler with Klemen Kosir; Studio Folder with Renata Salecl; Odo Fioravanti with Marin Medak. The resulting collaborations are shown at the Museum of Architecture and Design (MAO) in Ljubljana, which organises the Biennial, as well as seven sites across the Slovenian environment, ranging from the wild forest of Kocevje to the subterranean world of the Mayor’s Cave.

Feature, 18.05.2017

Tieranatomisches Theater
SYNTH by Jan-Peter E.R. Sonntag
May 19 – Jul 8, 2017

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Jan-Peter E.R. Sonntags SYNTH im Tieranatomischen Theater

Built in 1790, the Tieranatomisches Theater (Veterinary Anatomy Theatre) is the oldest still-existing academic building in Berlin. Since 2013, the Hermann von Helmholtz-Zentrum für Kulturtechnik has used the venue as an experimental exhibition space. Based on research and teaching at the Humboldt-Universität, the programming is dedicated to an interdisciplinary investigation of material cultures of knowledge, and to new practices in displaying them.

SYNTH, an installation on the phantasm of sound and music synthesis by the artist, composer and researcher Jan-Peter E.R. Sonntag, is one such investigation. Shown and heard throughout the Theater’s seven rooms, technical and aesthetic objects connect the 19th century’s physiology to Neue Musik, media theory of the 20th century, and contemporary experimental music. For Sonntag, sound art is spacial art, a form that addresses the percipient’s whole body. Space itself becomes corporeal as well: turning the classical anatomy theater into a Rausch-Körper (“body of noise”), the artist composed the three-act chamber opera SINUS especially for the venue’s unique architecture. There will be held a number of discussions, workshops and events regarding the exhibited objects and instruments. All the while, Sonntag’s radio opera RUNDFUNK AETERNA – a work commissioned by Documenta 14 – will be broadcasted worldwide. Sonntag developed his own special circuits for RUNDFUNK AETERNA, and, in the tradition of Marinetti, Arnheim and Brecht, investigates the radio and (radio wave) as a form.

Project, 17.05.2017

Fragments From Our Beautiful Future
The Bumiller Collection
May 19 – Aug 13, 2017

Refuting the idea of linear time, the 10th-century Arab thinkers of Kalam theorised the radical freedom of every single ‘now’. For the sake of God’s creative freedom, they demanded the dissociation of the present moment from the chains of cause and effect, and their ancient theories of ‘cut-up’ give rise to Fragments From Our Beautiful Future. Contemporary Interventions in The Bumiller Collection #3. The exhibition presents the work of Jerusalem-born Steve Labella and Berlin-based Rebecca Raue in a constellation with ancient chess pieces and Persian mirrors from the Bumiller Collection, dating from the 11th to the 17th century. In his series 38 Days of Re-Collection, Sabella imprints black & white photographs upon colored shards of paint, peeled off the walls of houses in the Old City of Jerusalem. Resembling ancient artifacts, the fifteen fragments present a unique archive of personal and collective memory, of home and displacement. Raue’s Kalila wa Dimna series uses acryl and mixed media to intervene in 18th-century illuminated manuscripts printed on aluminum composite panels. A dense layer of commentary is created on the colourful illustrations, and the artist develops a visual language that draws inspiration from the Lettrist appeal of the underlying Arabic texts. Folie1 Folie2

top work by Steve Labella / bottom works by Rebecca Raue

Feature, 13.05.2017

Kirstine Roepstorff – Danish Pavilion
Biennale di Venezia 2017

Images by Anders Sune Berg

Images by Anders Sune Berg

 

 

“Darkness dissolves form and is the void out of which all things arise.
Therefore, unlearning can be a positive force of progress.” – Kirstine Roepstorff

Developed by visual artist Kirstine Roepstorff for the Danish Pavilion at La Biennale di Venezia — 57th International Art Exhibition, the project influenza. theatre of glowing darkness challenges viewers to embrace darkness as a positive force of healing, transformation, and empowerment. The exhibition explores the metamorphosis that occurs between the destruction of the known and the embrace of the new. The title influenza contains dual meaning: in Italian it means “to influence,” in English it’s a common viral disease. If flu—as metaphor for the 21st century condition—is spread through social contact, its antidote may also be found in its own logic of person-to-person transmission: each individual’s ability to make affective choices, the grassroots power to influence change. It’s conceived as both symptom and cure. influenza consists of an immersive spatial theatre experience and a structural intervention in the pavilion and surrounding gardens. The large-scale installation uses light projections, glass, sound and a recorded dialogue between three disembodied protagonists: Dark River, Midwife, and Seed, to explore darkness as a condition of reconciliation. Instead of having a curator, the exhibition is structured as a discursive platform to bridge a multitude of perspectives. In this spirit, influenza was developed with the help of a ‘consortium’ of four curators – Sepake Angiama, Ute Meta Bauer, Solvej Helweg Ovesen, Angela Rosenberg – all of whom have previously worked with Roepstorff at pivotal moments in her career. Each member-curator contributed to the project through their reflections, and were invited to respond to Roepstorff’s concept as artists in their own right through different forms of prose published in an accompanying booklet. Over the course of a year, Roepstorff met regularly with the consortium to reflect upon darkness: not only through discussions, but also physical experiences – they’ve swum in the Black Sea, dined at Nocti Vagus (a famous restaurant where the clientele eats in total darkness), and participated in mediation sessions based on the principles of the Essenes, to enter and become one with darkness.

Project, 13.05.2017

Dirk Braeckman – Belgian Pavilion
Biennale di Venezia 2017

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Dirk Braeckman’s photographic works bring stillness to today’s constant flow of images and
information. For the 57th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia, the Belgian pavilion
will be presenting a series of the artist’s monumental photographic prints with a grey-tone palette on
baryta paper, curated by M-Museum Leuven’s senior curator, Eva Wittocx. Since the 1980s,
Braeckman has explored the boundaries of the medium and challenged photographic conventions.
Using analogue techniques, he has developed his own visual language that focuses on the act of
viewing and reflects on the status of the image. His images show anonymous subjects from his
immediate surroundings, evoking entirely open stories. Empty rooms in which time seems to stand
still, elements of interchangeable interiors or human figures – all separate from any specific identity,
place, time or emotion. Seemingly quiet moments and banal contexts are brewing with action.
Slowing down, seeking silence and peace, are all embodied in the works themselves as well as the
artist’s process. Instead of instant gratification, Braeckman might even take years before developing a negative as he wants to approach them in a more distanced manner. The resulting clandestine
images never reveal too much – it’s not about photographs that can be duplicated or recognized at a glance. Experimentation is crucial for both the registration of Braeckman’s images by the camera and their subsequent processing: the artist essentially creates his images in the darkroom. Over- and
underexposure, manipulation and development of the negative and photographic paper consistently
result in new and unrepeatable images; grain, spots, cropping and flattening of perspective resist an
immediate reading or interpretation of his work. Instead, they only hint at the underlying poetic
potential.

Project, 03.05.2017

Swiss Grand Award for Art /
Prix Meret Oppenheim 2017
The laureates

Switzerland’s Federal Office of Culture soon presents the seventeenth Swiss Grand Award for Art / Prix Meret Oppenheim to three outstanding Swiss culture practitioners: conceptual artist Daniela Keiser works with the media of photography and language, which she translates into different exhibition and presentation formats. Peter Märkli’s architecture, teachings and drawings are widely recognised and particularly valued by the younger generation of architects. The author and curator Philip Ursprung is honored for his cross-disciplinary research in history, art and architecture. The Swiss Grand Award for Art / Prix Meret Oppenheim was founded in 2001 by the Federal Office of Culture in collaboration with the Federal Art Commission. It honors figures from the worlds of art and architecture as well as criticism, curation and research whose work is of particular relevance and importance for contemporary art and architecture in Switzerland and beyond. The laureates, and this year’s winners of the Swiss Art Awards, will receive their accolades on June 12th, 2017, in Basel. The exhibition SWISS ART AWARDS, which showcases the participants in the second round of the Swiss Art Competition, also includes film portraits of the Swiss Grand Award for Art / Prix Meret Oppenheim 2017 recipients.

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left: Daniela Keiser, Out of the Blue (1998/2016) Installation Nr. 10. Installation view Kunsthalle Vebikus, Schaffhausen (2016). Courtesy of the artist and STAMPA Galerie, Basel © Daniela Keiser. Photo: Daniela Keiser // middle: Peter Märkli’s La Congiunta, Giornico 1992. Photo: Heinrich Helfenstein // right: Cover of the new book by Philip Ursprung ‘Der Wert der Oberfläche – Essays zu Architektur, Kunst und Ökonomie’. gta Verlag, 2017. // Portraits by Katalin Deér / BAK, 2017.

Feature, 28.04.2017

Gallery Weekend Berlin
28–30 April 2017

Gallery Weekend Berlin is a celebration of the galleries and serves as a culmination of their year-round activity. As they discover artists, maintain lasting relationships with them, and continually promote and disseminate their work worldwide, the galleries are a point of contact for curators, critics, and collectors. Sprawled across 47 spaces in the city, easy to find with the Gallery Weekend Map

All from Instagram BUREAU N

All from Instagram Gallery Weekend

Project, 27.04.2017

Between Spaces – ZKR Center for Art and Public Space
Apr 28 – Oct 8, 2017

piece by Tomás Saracena (2017) and installation by Diana Sirianni

piece by Tomás Saracena (2017) and installation by Diana Sirianni

How do political and economic interests shape the urban environment? Which boundaries and power structures are encoded in it? In Between Spaces, 15 artists examine questions and contradictions found in urban life. The exhibition places work by Gordon Matta-Clark and perspectives on East Berlin into a dialogue with current artistic positions. The featured artists appropriate unused spaces and lend new forms to the inconspicuous spaces in-between. From 1970s New York to 1980s East Berlin and the global village of today, various frames of reference are brought together with the notion of urban space acting as the social, artistic and political hub of a society. Artistic positions on urbanism and public space, with Gordon Matta-Clark, Isa Melsheimer, Sabine Peuckert, Andrea Pichl, Diana Sirianni, Annemirl Bauer, Sibylle Bergemann, Simon Faithfull, Antje Fretwurst-Colberg, Brigitte Fugmann, Raumlabor, Marjetica Potrc, KUNSTrePUBLIK, Tomás Saraceno, and Ursula Strozynski.

ZKR

Simon Faithfull, 0o00 Navigation Part2 – A Journey Across Europe and Africa, 2015. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Polaris, Paris / Andrea Pichl, “Bau auf, bau auf.” 2010-2017. Courtesy the artist and Krome Gallery / Gordon Matta Clark, Splitting, 1974 Courtesy of the Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark & Galerie Thomas Schulte

 

Feature, 24.04.2017

Experiments at Jochum Rodgers
Apr 26 – Jun 3, 2017

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From a period of political upheaval and rebellion against existing societal structures, a diverse set of stylistic trends emerged in the 60s and 70s. For the exhibition ‘Experiments’ Jochum Rodgers combines unusual design objects of the two decades in question selected by numerous architects, designers and artists. As the title implies, what acted as a driving force for the creation of the objects was not merely functional necessity but the actual pleasure derived from experimentation. Among the iconic exhibits, there are pieces by Joe Colombo, Pietro Cascella, Gianfranco Fini, Pier Giacomo & Achille Castiglioni, Frank O. Gehry, Piero Gilardi, Hans Gugelot, Gruppo Archizoom, Gruppo A.R.D.I.T.I., Ennio Lucini, Hans von Klier, Angelo Mangiarotti, Gino Marotta, Casati Ponzio, Gino Sarfatti, Ettore Sottsass, Studio Tetrarch and Superstudio.

 

top picture: TOVAGLIA coffee table (Studio Tetrarch) bottom pictures: Prismar lamp (A.R.D.I.T.I.) / Rampa , design by Pier Giacomo & Achille Castiglione, 1963 / „You’ll come back“ chair by Ceretti, Derossi, Rosso, Torneraj 1969

top picture: TOVAGLIA coffee table (Studio Tetrarch), 1969
bottom pictures: Prismar lamp (A.R.D.I.T.I.) / Rampa , design by Pier Giacomo & Achille Castiglione, 1963 / „You’ll come back“ chair by Ceretti, Derossi, Rosso, Torneraj 1969

Project, 13.04.2017

Swiss Grand Award for Design 2017
Recognising the movers and shakers of the creative landscape in Switzerland

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Since 2007, in addition to the Swiss Design Awards, the Federal Office of Culture has presented the Swiss Grand Award for Design to individual designers or established firms that contribute to the renown of Swiss design nationally and internationally. Having originated as a means of encouraging, supporting and ultimately honouring the Swiss design scene, the prize communicates and indicates the traditions of Swiss design. This year the disciplines of the three laureates range from graphic design to jewellery and illustration; all of which have played a key role in the cultural fabric of Switzerland. David Bielander translates simple, everyday objects into items straddling the line between jewellery and artwork. His contemporary pieces open up unexpected lines of communication and discreetly narrate underlying stories for both the wearer and the perceiver. Another mode of storytelling is found in the work of Thomas Ott whose dark, meticulous comics don’t contain words yet manage to be universally comprehensible. As Ott’s work becomes more layered and complex, it gives rise to kaleidoscopic narratives and painstaking detail. This marked the first time that the award goes to a comic artist. Similarly following a precise optical language and consistent set of tools, Jean Widmer, one of the first Swiss graphic designers in Paris, produces clear designs ahead of their time. Among others, he’s created the visual identity for such institutions as Musée?d’Orsay and Centre Georges Pompidou – where his emblematic logo still remains.