Project, 29.11.2018

Friedrich von Borries addresses the political moment in design
Nov 30, 2018 – Sept 29, 2019

FVB_web_vs4
The manifesto by Friedrich von Borries, an installation view from the exhibition at Neue Sammlung The Design Museum and Die Münchner Rutsche, Berlin 2018 | © Projektbüro Friedrich von Borries, graphic manifesto: Ingo Offermanns, photo Die Münchner Rutsche: Achim Hatzius

The last decade has seen catastrophic shifts in global politics, economy and the environment. Foregrounding the role of contemporary positions in design, architect and design theorist Friedrich von Borries raises the question around socially and politically responsible practices. Engaging with his earlier literary work that proposed new methods for social criticism through art and design, the exhibition reframes Borries’ pragmatic approach through a series of interventions in the museum space. “Politics of Design” is the first of the three parts that conceptually underpin the exhibition and addresses the political moment in design. It uses the theses ”design sexualizes”, “design colonizes” and “design manipulates” as entryways to open up new perspective on Coca-Cola advertising, the Sony Walkman and modernist furniture. The second part of the exhibition takes a personal reading of the Friedrich von Borries’ work through a Sisyphean marble-run installation by the artist Mikael Mikael that points at the absurdist dimension of a politically active artist and designer. The third part “Design as Politics” explores the possibilities for shaping the political environment through design. Coexisting as a carrier of messages and a tool of influence design is used to persuade. The question we have a responsibility to ask is, “Persuade to do what and to whose benefit?”

Project, 23.10.2018

Under the title “WORK” Vitra addresses the increased merging of office and public space
Oct 23–27, 2018 AT ORGATEC

When designer duo Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby observe that “the rules of formal work are dissolving, resulting in the archetype of classic desk disappearing”, they underline a growing transformation of work environment, setting the scene for Vitra’s latest presentation at Orgatec trade fair. Under the tile “WORK” Vitra addresses the increased merging of office and public space, highlighting three exemplary office concepts which make propositions for the changing needs of modern work. Konstantin Grcic’s concept of “Superflexible Office” deals with the possibilities of constantly rebuilding the office while still preserving its identity: open to be reconfigured as a meeting room, a café or a communal space. With “Company Home”, the architect Sevil Peach has developed a different scenario which also includes a park and a dining area – elements of public space that are becoming an integral part of architecture in more corporate headquarters. “Shared Office” blurs the boundaries between the office and the public space, as we become more familiarised with working in environments such as co-working spaces, cafés and hotel lobbies. As part of this concept “Soft Work” is a new modular sofa system by Vitra that responds to these conditions, developed in collaboration with designers Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby.

Project, 29.09.2018

Victor Papanek: The Politics of Design
Sept 29, 2018–March 03, 2019

What is social design and is there such a thing anyway? The term is typically used to label the work of those designers and architects who focus on tasks born out of humanitarian and socio-political issues, and it has often gone hand in hand with moralism and sweeping declarations. In a world growing deficient in both resources and energy, questions regarding inclusion, social justice, and sustainability are becoming more relevant to today’s design than ever before. In the 1960s and 70s Viktor Papanek was among the first to address not only issues of living conditions, class and income difference, but also environmental responsibility. Many designers practicing today carry in their pocket his “little green book” Design for the Real World (1971), which remains the most widely read book about design ever published. The exhibition at the Vitra Design Museum dedicated to the life and work of this prolific author, designer and lecturer is set to re-examine methods, usage and applications of Papanek’s approach to design as a political tool. Both a retrospective and a thematic exhibition, it gathers his manifold drawings, objects, films, manuscripts, and prints, some of which have never before been presented. Drawing upon his inter-disciplinary and collaborative methods, the exhibition forges dialogues between contemporary works from the areas of critical and social design, and radical positions from the 1960s to 1980s, including legendary figures such as George Nelson, Richard Buckminster Fuller, Marshall McLuhan, or the radical design initiative ‘Global Tools’. Contemporary works from the areas of critical and social design provide insight into Papanek’s lasting impact.Web_Papanek

Victor J. Papanek, We are all handicapped (drafted with students in 1969). Section from Big Character Poster No. 1: Work Chart for Designers (1973). | Victor J. Papanek, Tin Can Radio, 1971. | Victor J. Papanek filming the WNED-TV Channel 17 programme Design Dimensions in Buffalo, NY (1961 – 1963). | Victor J. Papanek, The minimal design team (drafted with students in 1969). Section from Big Character Poster No. 1: Work Chart for Designers (1973). | © University of Applied Arts Vienna, Victor J. Papanek Foundation

 

Project, 21.09.2018

BNKR | SPACE IS THE PLACE (1/4):
Thresholds. Limits of Space
Sept 13–Dec 9, 2018

Web_BNKRAndrea Fraser, Little Frank and His Carp, 2001 © The artist, Galerie Nagel Draxler | Jeewi Lee, Einschlag © The artist | Raul Watch, Eureka, 2015 © The artist | Wermke / Leinkauf, Überwindungsübungen, 2015 © Wermke / Leinkauf
The exhibition cycle SPACE IS THE PLACE starts with the group exhibition Thresholds. Limits of Space. Based on Bruce Nauman’s seminal work Body Pressure (1974) which provides a set of typed out instructions for merging their bodies with an architectural surface, the exhibition explores the corporal-spatial unit of critically experiencing space through the works of different generations of artists. In her ingenious single channel video performance entitled Little Frank and His Carp (2001), the American artist Andrea Fraser is for example seen walking around the atrium of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao listening to the institution’s official audio guide, which culminates in an equally ironic and erotic encounter between the artist and the architecture. Wermke/Leinkauf investigate the surmounting of architectures in Berlin’s former border area in a 6-channel slide projection. Here, archive images from 1974/75 depicting East German border troops simulating an escape at a so called “Lehrgrenze“ (“training border“) serve as source material for the German artist duo. The work reflects upon the former border situation and deals in a playful way with history, freedom and memory. With new in-situ works Jeewi Lee and Raul Walch also dedicate themselves to artistic conquest of spatial borderlines in interior and exterior spaces. Jeewi Lee’s Einschlag (“Impact”) ingeniously inverts the actual purpose of a wrecking ball as an instrument to bring down walls and demolish buildings. Hanging from the ceiling of the former bomb shelter, the wrecking ball appears as if after an act of destruction. Obvious traces of deformation caused by the inner walls of the exhibition space show on the wrecking ball and not as originally preconceived. Here, the wrecking ball itself becomes a metaphorical depiction of the brutal history of the WWII bunker. Raul Walch takes the discourse into the urban realm with a series of work entitled Eureka. In Berlin and Munich, Walch transforms city hydrants in the surrounding urban environment into ephemeral fountains. 

Project, 12.09.2018

RED BULL MUSIC ACADEMY BRINGS ART AND DESIGN TO FUNKHAUS BERLIN
SEP 8–OCT 12, 2018

Web_Funkhaus_1© Thomas Meyer

Berlin is a fascinating yet chaotic whirlwind of clashing architectural sites, with some of its most monumental and distinctive landmarks inherited from the German Democratic Republic era. Distinctively embodying the GDR’s engineering ambitions, Funkhaus is a colossal broadcasting centre and studio complex designed during the 1950s by the distinguished Bauhaus architect Franz Ehrlich. His job was to create the world’s largest and most sophisticated recording facility that promised to be an ideal marriage of German functionality and Eastern decadence. It was constructed to symbolize the virtues of equality, collectivity and openness by bringing a wide array of musical genres under one roof. Red Bull Music Academy is celebrating their 20th anniversary at the historic complex, which has been converted into a creative microcosm. 61 international musicians have been selected to participate in the Academy, they will have the opportunity to exchange ideas, learn new things and expand their musical vocabulary. Design studio New Tendency has created a bespoke furniture collection for the Academy, combining lounge modules, tables and sofas that bring back the essence of Bauhaus design principles and through a poetic and playful tone rejuvenate the functional and rational aesthetic of the interiors. Part of the transformation is an exhibition showcasing Berlin’s established and most promising emerging artists. Hailing from different generations, the artists have been carefully selected by Johann König. The exhibition takes central stage at the Lecture Hall with large-scale paintings by Karl Horst Hödicke, a pioneer of German neo-expressionism and a representative of the New Figuration, depicting Berlin in the decades before and after the fall of the wall.

Feature, 11.06.2018

Swiss Design Awards
June 11–17, 2018

Parallel with Art Basel, the Swiss Design Awards exhibition offers a detailed insight into contemporary Swiss design. From richly diverse areas of photography, graphic design, fashion and textile design, product and industrial design as well as scenography and mediation, the jury will grant 17 Swiss Design Awards to selected participants. Since 2007, in addition to the Swiss Design Awards, the Federal Office of Culture has presented the Swiss Grand Award for Design to individual designers or established firms that contribute to the renown of Swiss design nationally and internationally. Having originated as a means of encouraging, supporting and ultimately honouring the Swiss design scene, the prize communicates and indicates the traditions of Swiss design. This year the winners of the renowned prize this year are textile designer Cécile Feilchenfeldt, manufacturer of professional pruning shears Felco and graphic designer Rosmarie Tissi.

Jean-Vincent Simonet / Adrien Rovero / David Schatz, Sereina Rothenberg from NICE Magazine / sign of Swiss Art Awards and Swiss Design Awards

Jean-Vincent Simonet / Adrien Rovero / David Schatz, Sereina Rothenberg from NICE Magazine / sign of Swiss Art Awards and Swiss Design Awards

Project, 11.04.2018

Vitra at La Pelota / Milan Design Week
Typecasting – An Assembly of Iconic,
Forgotten and New Vitra Characters
April 17–22, 2018

Installation view Photo: Eduardo Perez ®Vitra

Installation view Photo: Eduardo Perez ®Vitra

 

My stool is an Athlete. Me too? In conjunction with Milan Design Week 2018, Vitra presents the exhibition Typecasting, a panorama of some 200 objects curated by designer Robert Stadler. The Austrian designer looks at the furniture in this installation outside the context of conventional categories, such as their functional uses or historical origins. Instead, he regards them as characters and assigns them to groups that reflect stereotypical behaviour patterns and personality profiles in contemporary society. Drawing on the extensive Vitra archives, the show places current products alongside icons, prototypes, special editions, rejects and future visions. Another central question is how changes in society could affect established furniture typologies. Various designers – including Konstantin Grcic, Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby, Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, and Commonplace Studio – were invited to develop ideas for a collective living space under the title The Communal Sofa.

Project, 16.03.2018

Night Fever: Designing Club Culture 1960 – today
Vitra Design Museum
Mar 16 – Sep 9, 2018

NightFever Homepage
Soundsystem Despacio, New Century Hall, Manchester International Festival, Juli 2013 © Rod Lewis / Guests at Studio 54, New York, 1979. © Bill Bernstein, David Hill Gallery, London / Installation views, Photos: Mark Niedermann

Nightclubs and discothèques are hotbeds of contemporary culture. Since the 20th century, they have been centres of the avant-garde that question the established codes of social life and experiment with different realities. Interior and furniture design merges with graphics, and art with sound, light, fashion and special effects to create a modern Gesamtkunstwerk. Night Fever is the first exhibition to give a comprehensive overview of the design history of the nightclub, examining its cultural context from numerous perspectives. Examples range from Italian clubs of the 1960s created by the protagonists of Radical Design to the legendary Studio 54 where Andy Warhol was a regular, from the Palladium in New York designed by Arata Isozaki to more recent concepts by the OMA architecture studio for the Ministry of Sound in London. Featuring films and vintage photographs, posters, flyers and fashion, the exhibition incorporates music, light and spatial installations to take visitors on a fascinating journey through a world of glamour and subcultures – always in search of the night that never ends. In a night that never ends, the exhibition begs the question of whether the disco culture has evolved into a particular direction.

Feature, 12.01.2018

50 Years of Panton Chair
Vitra celebrates an icon with limited editions at IMM Cologne
Jan 15 – 21, 2018

panton

© Vitra | bottom: design sketches by Panton, probably between 1957 and 1960, Vitra Design Museum Archives

After several years of joint development by Verner Panton and Vitra, the Panton Chair was finally ready for production in 1967 as the first all-plastic cantilever chair to be manufactured in one piece. Created with a revolutionary technique even for today’s standards, the chair’s unique sculptural design was presented to the public for the first time at the imm Furniture Fair in Cologne in 1968. It rapidly came to symbolize an entire era. Now, 50 years after its launch, Vitra is celebrating this timeless icon by issuing two limited editions that bring lustre and luminosity to those dynamic curves: Panton Chrome and Panton Glow. The inspiration for the first one derives from Verner Panton’s fascination with mirrored surfaces and his extensive experiments with diverse reflective effects. An old dream of the designer finally comes to fruition as a recent complex process prevents its previous sensitivity to scratching. On the other hand, Panton Glow accentuates luminosity and a certain “radiance from within” due to phosphorescent pigments that absorb daylight and emit a blue glow in the dark. The jubilee duo shines bright, paying homage to the design’s smooth twists and bends.

Feature, 13.12.2017

Design Display #6 at Autostadt Wolfsburg
Maarten Baas and Dave Hakkens
Dec 5, 2017 – Mar 31, 2018

 

designdisplay
top Baas Maartens´ Smoke, bottom Dave Hakkens´ bloks. both © Frank Hülsbömer

Shiny, immaculate, new: these are the qualities we expect from the objects with which we surround ourselves. But one often forgets that aging is also part of life – and design. Transience, the theme taken on by the sixth Design Display exhibition, is much more than a philosophical question. Two designers who deal with the concept of impermanence in different ways take center stage: Maarten Baas destroys in order to create, while Dave Hakkens develops concepts of sustainability. Though both of them share the opinion that good design is more than good looks. For the Smoke series, Baas took iconic design pieces and torched them until they were left charred. In reworking design classics, Maarten Baas’ productive act of destruction not only shows the surface’s vulnerability, but the transience of the original design intentions. The torched versions call for the recognition that things must elapse to make room for the new. Facing Baas on the other side of the glass display, is Dutch designer Dave Hakkens with his Phonebloks – a concept for a smartphone made up entirely of individual modules. The idea is that different “bloks” can be assembled on the motherboard like Lego blocks. These blocks are autonomous functional units such as batteries, processors, speakers, cameras, or memory cards. Users can assemble or upgrade their device at will, as well as easily replace broken parts. The transience of a single module doesn’t spell the end for the whole device. The transience of a single module doesn’t spell the end for the whole device. In the On Display magazine accompanying the exhibition, the fascination with ephemerality and the allure of decay are further explored.